This health video focus' around embryo correction which can correct genes that are defective.
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Jennifer Matthews: From the time they were married, Lynda and Joe Profaci knew they wanted a child. Lynda Profaci: It was just something I felt that I really wanted, my husband and I. So it was, it was very important. Jennifer Matthews: But had they listened to doctors, they would not have Tia. Lynda Profaci: And they said, 'I'm sorry, we can't do anymore.' Jennifer Matthews: Medication, surgery and in vitro fertilization failed. Still Lynda and Joe were not ready to give in. Lynda Profaci: I knew in my heart it wasn't over. Jennifer Matthews: The problem was fragments that formed when the cells split. Dr. Mina Alikani: The fragments that are produced are just pieces of cytoplasm that are bound by membrane. Jennifer Matthews: With fragments in the way, the good cells can struggle to communicate and form a healthy embryo. So, in a delicate procedure using micro-tools, the fragments are removed. Dr. Mina Alikani: To the patients, it would mean the difference between conception or failure to conceive. Jennifer Matthews: To Lynda and Joe, it meant hearing the news they thought they'd never hear. Joe Profaci: We didn't even hear anything else except that your pregnant, and we were ecstatic. Jennifer Matthews: And one year ago, the day they'd dreamed of for six years came. Lynda Profaci: I look at her and I get tears in my eyes. Jennifer Matthews: And to go along with those tears, have been plenty of smiles. Joe Profaci: They say a baby changes the house, and she really did. Jennifer Matthews: This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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