Learn about the devastating effects of Sleep Apnea and Snoring on life and Health. Also how it directly effects both adults and children.
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Brock Rondeau: Which is inability to sleep, snoring and sleep apnea 90 million people, that's almost afford to the population. Mike Wiegenstein: That treatment options feedback, we don't ever really see and we'll science, don't let friends drive drunk. We don't see scientists they let friends drive sleeping and getting ready come talk to you I have lot of friends in the long portion of business and lot more -- and I found of them that sleep in entire drivers cause for more accidents in drunk drivers. Brock Rondeau: Right. Mike Wiegenstein: But yet we never see that depressed. Brock Rondeau: If you sleep apnea, they will not give you the license to drive at motor vehicle. Mike Wiegenstein: If you have severe sleep Brock Rondeau: If you have severe sleep apnea you have to be under treatment. Mike Wiegenstein: Alright, we're going and when we came back we'll take a quick break and then we get in the discussion watch medical news network I'm Mike Wiegenstein in studio with Dr. Brock Rondeau will be right back. Mike Wiegenstein: Welcome back, I'm in studio with Dr. Rondeau talking about sleep apnea and TMJ condition that effects close to 90 million people in North America. Alright doctor before went to break we're talking about sleep apnea children, sleep apnea adult I mean does it really have a particular person effects you told me --children is young as 4, 5 years old? Brock Rondeau: That the -- Mike is prevention. If we can prevent these problems with the children and they'll never have sleep apnea and they'll never have TMJ problems and so that's why I like using these functional appliances to bring the jaws forward. When you bring the jaw forward, you bring forward open the air way. Mike Wiegenstein: I want to tell you when you with I first only then I would bring the jaw forward. I'm think that I did research there are doctors that do surgery to -- and move the jaw forward it's sounds like it is a very involved painful process, but you are telling me there is no basically no pain at all. Brock Rondeau: No pain at all, you were adrenal appliances like two retainers that bring the jaw forward it's very, very easy. Mike Wiegenstein: Now they wear those at night when they sleep. Brock Rondeau: Wear those nights, when they sleep. Mike Wiegenstein: Okay, Now show me again what, what it looks like, because I don't think people that this is for an adult. Brock Rondeau: First of all there is about 90 different designs, but certain -- designs but that they like the best but this particular design it's very simple and you can see it's a little hook hanging -- hook under here and that moves the jaw forward and the jaw can fall back at night. Mike Wiegenstein: And if the jaw can fall back the tongue can fall back which keeps the air way open. Brock Rondeau: Absolutely, it's very simple principle. Mike Wiegenstein: Alright, now show me the one you did earlier for the children, that most of kids going this twin block Brock Rondeau: This a twin block appliances that also keeps the jaw forward, it's got two blocks the inner lock at 70 degrees, Mike Wiegenstein: Now can they open their mouth, then close you mouth, when it looks kids obviously to mouth less start closely -probably low cost to forward. Brock Rondeau: I'm look in close but the only close once back, if they put this block and cover that block. Mike Wiegenstein: It just makes it - forward Brock Rondeau: They can close, so they always bring the jaw forward close like that and they do that. They wear that appliances for seven months, the jaw stays forward, tongues were stays forward. They never have sleep apnea, but now the only other thing with children have to make sure that there is no large anginoid tonsils get those tonsils manuals-- Mike Wiegenstein: Now, but if you went to the, they came to you with mom and dad, and they brought their child and you saw that you would then refer them how to have the tonsils remove first Brock Rondeau: That's correct, I'm we work with in e

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