Amy reviews the EatSmart Nutrition Scale, a food scale that weighs food and gives you nutrition data.
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Hi! This is Amy and welcome to Eating Low. Today, I don’t have a recipe for you but I do have a product to review. And you guys know I rarely ever have done a product review. But this is a great little product that I do want to share with you because it will be helpful to somebody out there who’s trying to lose weight. And when I was losing weight, weighing your food is really important. It helped me see the portion sizes and also you need that if you’re going to enter your food into like food day or daily plate, you need to know how much it weighs. So, I have a food scale, but that’s all it did. It didn’t tell you the carbs or anything so it was this multiple stuff process, you’re weighing your food then you’re running off to the computer to enter your food. And if you’ve already eaten your food, well you know if you may eat 10 carbs of broccoli, then too late, you’ve already eaten it. What’s great about this scale is that you can weigh your food and get the nutrition information all while you’re preparing the food. So, you don’t have to run back and forth to see your computer, you don’t really have to plan ahead as much and that’s really great. So, this is the EatSmart Nutrition scale and it is different than my food scale, my old one. It’s got more buttons and don’t be intimidated by this because it will get simpler as you go along. My old scale only had three buttons, this has tons of stuff but it does weigh more than my scale that I used to have. So, what’s also great about this scale is that you can calculate an entire meal on your plate right on the one scale at one time. And to me, that’s what totally separates it from all the other food scales that I’ve seen. So, to do that, you’re going to set your plate on the scale. My scale is currently off. When you turn the scale on, it’s going to zero it out. Now, if for some reason you turn on your scale and then put the plate on, you will just hit the tear button and that zeroes out the scale so it’s not weighing the weight of the plate. So, what we’re going to do is take some chicken and this is a pretty average, like I’m going to try and create a meal, it’s a little basic, just for demonstration purposes. And then we’re going to put a bunch of chicken on the scale. Now, we have to tell it what that is because it has all that information in the scale. You just have to access it. So, we’ve got our chicken on there. The code for chicken, which they’ve got in book that you’ve got with your scale that lists all the foods, you know, it’s the basic foods that you mean. And so, I looked up on my book and I found chicken breast roasted, no skin, and that code is 441. So, I type that in. This is dry meat. There’s a 153 calories in this batch chicken, zero carbs and zero fiber which we know, it’s a meat, you know there’s not going to be carbs or fiber. But what’s also great is if you press the 1, 2, 3, 4 key, it will give you more nutrients. So, we can see that there’s sodium, 68 grams. You’ve got potassium, 238 grams. Some of these numbers don’t mean that much to me. I don’t track my potassium levels and things like that but somebody may care. If you press it again, you’ve got your fat is 3 grams of fat. I was making it heavy because I was weighing it. Saturated fat is 0.9 and cholesterol is 79. And if you press it again, you can see that you’ve got calcium, they’ve also got protein, it’s 29 grams of protein. And that’s important for people who track their protein and want to know how much protein they’re eating a day. And another thing that’s great about this is you get used to seeing how much is 29 grams of protein. Well right here, now I’ve got a visual cue and I can match the two together. It’s not something that’s abstract on my computer. It’s actually right there in front of me. And that to me is important because it’s training you to eat the right portion sizes and how much of a portion size is going to weigh what, how many carbs, how many calories. These are all important th

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