This health video focus' on the increase in eating disorders in men, stemming from unrealistic images in the media.
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Dr. Dean Edell: Puff, chiseled, stacked, this is the new male ideal. Stacey Tantleff-Dunn: We see an increase in advertising, and so many more messages directed at men and how they can improve their appearance. Dr. Dean Edell: The average man sees at least 25 appearance-related ads everyday. Stacey Tantleff-Dunn: Men who are exposed to images of the so-called ideal male became more depressed and significantly more dissatisfied with their own muscles. Dr. Dean Edell: And for some the dissatisfaction can have a dangerous consequence. Stacey Tantleff-Dunn: We are finally recognizing that men are as vulnerable to some of these messages as women have been for so long. Ron Harris: There is a phrase I like to use when people ask me if I am obsessed, and that is, obsessed is a word the lazy use to describe the dedicated. Dr. Dean Edell: That dedication started when Ron Harris was only 13. Ron Harris: I was always like the runt out of the group of kids, very unathletic, picked on, just low self-esteem. Dr. Dean Edell: Training and competition not only built Ron's self-esteem, but consumed him. For others, the obsession can turn into an eating disorder. Mike: I wanted to be as skinny as I possibly could. Dr. Dean Edell: Mike is anorexic and bulimic. Roberto Olivardia: With women who struggle with an eating disorder, it doesn't violate their femininity, it doesn't violate their gender in anyway, whereas for men, it does. Dr. Dean Edell: Mike is getting help, but there are many men who are not. Olivia Beckman: It's not a female disease. It's a human disease. Dr. Dean Edell: I am Dr. Dean Edell.

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