This medical video looks into easier processes for hysterectomy.
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Jennifer Matthews: For Joanne Laurie, it's the little things and the little ones that matter. Her recent diagnosis of endometrial cancer came as a big shock. Joanne Laurie: I was crushed and had no idea. I was absolutely devastated. Jennifer Matthews: Joanne needed a hysterectomy. Usually, that involves a large incision and up to eight weeks of recovery. But Doctor Alfred Jenkins now performs hysterectomies with this thin laparoscope. Dr. Alfred Jenkins: There's no question that a laparoscopic procedure in a patient is a less morbid procedure in the sense that patients feel better; they have less pain; they get out of the hospital quicker. Jennifer Matthews: He makes three or four tiny incisions in the abdomen and inserts a lighted scope with a camera on the end. Images are magnified on a monitor. Dr. Alfred Jenkins: We can see small blood vessels, and we can dissect in much smaller spaces with a finer degree of control than we can on open cases because we have the limitation of our eyes. Jennifer Matthews: Long instruments that fit in the scope are used to remove the uterus. The surgery usually takes longer, but patients like Joanne say it's worth it. She was back to normal in about three weeks and she's cancer-free. Joanne Laurie: The cancer has actually forced me to take a look at my life, and my priorities, and to have and to enjoy my grandchildren. Jennifer Matthews: And she'll continue to enjoy them even if she can't keep up. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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