Easier Diabetic Care For Kids Video

This health video focus on how to improve diabetic care in children.
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Jennifer Matthews: Type 1 diabetes caused four-year-old Camden Greene's blood sugar to swing dramatically. Despite several daily shots of insulin and carefully-timed meals, his blood sugar was often too high or too low. Amanda Greene: We were really concerned about the long-term effects with him being so young of having these highs and lows and nothing in between all the time. Jennifer Matthews: So Duke University researchers fitted Camden with an insulin pump. Doctors used to think children under five were too young for that. Michael Freemark: The concern was that the children might pull the pump out, the injection site would get disrupted. In fact, it hasn't happened. Jennifer Matthews: There was also concern that the pump might increase the risk of high blood glucose as well as severe low blood sugar, which can cause seizures, coma and developmental problems. Michael Freemark: We found in a sense the opposite. We were able to control blood sugars more effectively and reduced the frequency of severe hypoglycemia. Jennifer Matthews: Training parents how to use the pump is the key. Camden's mom says, it's simple. Amanda Greene: Camden can even use it himself now. He's told not to, but he does know how to use it. Camden Greene: The insulin pump is the only one that can take care of this. Jennifer Matthews: Now no more strict schedule of shots and meals, fewer dangerous drops in blood sugar, and more time to play. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting. Jennifer Matthews: Type 1 diabetes caused four-year-old Camden Greene's blood sugar to swing dramatically. Despite several daily shots of insulin and carefully-timed meals, his blood sugar was often too high or too low. Amanda Greene: We were really concerned about the long-term effects with him being so young of having these highs and lows and nothing in between all the time. Jennifer Matthews: So Duke University researchers fitted Camden with an insulin pump. Doctors used to think children under five were too young for that. Michael Freemark: The concern was that the children might pull the pump out, the injection site would get disrupted. In fact, it hasn't happened. Jennifer Matthews: There was also concern that the pump might increase the risk of high blood glucose as well as severe low blood sugar, which can cause seizures, coma and developmental problems. Michael Freemark: We found in a sense the opposite. We were able to control blood sugars more effectively and reduced the frequency of severe hypoglycemia. Jennifer Matthews: Training parents how to use the pump is the key. Camden's mom says, it's simple. Amanda Greene: Camden can even use it himself now. He's told not to, but he does know how to use it. Camden Greene: The insulin pump is the only one that can take care of this. Jennifer Matthews: Now no more strict schedule of shots and meals, fewer dangerous drops in blood sugar, and more time to play. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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