Early Detection of Aneurysms Video

This medical video talks about the new process to be able to detect aneurysms earlier.
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Jennifer Matthews: Pope Watson loves the predictability of everyday life. It was a shock to him when a routine doctor's visit uncovered a deadly problem. Pope Watson: They located an aneurysm, and it really needed attention right away. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors often call aneurysms ticking time bombs. 90 percent occur in the abdominal aorta -- when an artery wall starts to balloon. If the aneurysm ruptures, it can be fatal. Dr. Ross Milner: That's a horrible situation. Almost half of the patients, if they suffer a ruptured aneurysm, won't even make it to the hospital. Jennifer Matthews: Emory surgeon Ross Milner used a stent to redirect pope's blood flow, much like a detour. Most patients have frequent CT scans to look for leaks, but Pope was part of a study that used this tiny implant and this antenna to work as an internal watchdog. Dr. Ross Milner: The pressure sensors let us know what the pressure is in the aneurysm sac and will hopefully allow us to detect problems sooner. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Milner says 110 people have had the implant put in with no complications. So far, the results look good. Dr. Ross Milner: Right now, our main goal is it'll eliminate the possible bad side effects of a CT scan. Jennifer Matthews: Those effects include radiation exposure as well as danger to the kidneys from the contrast dyes used with CT scans. Now, Pope looks forward to playing that game even longer. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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