Early Days of Breastfeeding Video

Philippa Bennet tells her experience in the early stages of breastfeeding.
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Emma Howard: Hello! I'm Emma Howard and we're talking about breastfeeding here on the Baby Channel. With me is Heather Welford, who is breastfeeding counselor from the NCT and we've got Philippa and five-and-a-half month old Toby. Well, you two are doing very well. He's your fourth baby. Philippa Bennett: Yes. Emma Howard: You are in a very comfortable position there and clearly he is. But I want to talk about the early days of breastfeeding. Even though he was your fourth baby, you had quite a lot of problems with him in the beginning. Philippa Bennett: Yeah. I think it's very difficult in the first few days, especially the first day, because it's all so new and even though he's my fourth baby, all babies are different. Like every pregnancy is different, every birth is different. My birth experience with Toby was fantastic compared to my other birth experiences. So I did feed him quicker and earlier. I fed him virtually straight away. Emma Howard: She came together. Philippa Bennett: Yeah. So we bonded much more quickly I feel. But there're still lots of issues that I had with Toby that I didn't have with the others. I had very, very sore nipples with Toby. Emma Howard: Is that because he wanted to feed all the time. Philippa Bennett: Yeah. He's very hungry but he always has been since the first day he was born, very, very hungry feeding a lot and sort of almost ravenous, really quite scary. I did have very sore nipples in the first few days. But also all that, all the stuff about positioning and how to hold your baby, you do forget it even though it's my fourth baby, you do forget how you should hold them where their mouth should go, where your nipple should go, all this kind of stuff and it took me probably three or four days to get into the swing of it, to make it become part of a natural thing for me. Emma Howard: And on top of that you have these terrible after pains. Philippa Bennett: Oh, yes. Emma Howard: Didn't you? Your uterus was contracting. Philippa Bennett: Yes. I went on to the postnatal ward and started to feed Toby and had the most horrendous pains which actually felt almost identical to contractions and I felt for a second I felt perhaps I am having twins. They have left one there, because I have had twins previously, so I am, perhaps I am having -- they have left one there. But I was in real, real pain and when the doctors came around and the midwifes and that sort of thing and asked me do I need any pain relief for my vaginal area, and I was saying no, no that's fine, but can I've some pain killers please for my after pains are so dreadful. So it's something maybe Heather can find some, I don't know if -- Emma Howard: Well, I want Heather to comment on it because I know you'll be scaring a lot of new mums out there. It was your fourth baby. Philippa Bennett: Yes. Emma Howard: It does happen, doesn't it? The after pains are in a sort of spectrum out there. I didn't have the after pains that you've described. But if I go on to have a third baby maybe I will, although you just put me off. I mean, how common are these after pain feelings? Heather Welford: Yeah. Philippa has had it quite bad. I've had three children. I don't remember anything more than a little twinge and it was a long time ago. But I don't remember if they were as bad as that. But bottle feeding mothers get it is well because the uterus has to get down to a pre-pregnancy state but with the breastfeeding, it can be more acute for a period of time, because when you breastfeed you course a rush of oxytocin which is the hormone that makes our uteruses contract in labor and that's why it's more acute during breastfeeding times. But the good news is that it does pass the sore nipples as well that you have got. It can make breastfeeding really difficult at first and this is why positioning and attachment is so important and it's unique, if I look at this little nun. Emma Howard: He's drunk on milk. Look at him. And it's important to say that He

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