This medical video looks at how may be retraining the brain can help combat dyslexia.
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Jennifer Mathews: Growing up, school was tough for Dee Register. Adapting to different jobs has been tough, too. Dee Register: I got called airhead a lot. Last name is Register, so I got empty register jokes quite often. Jennifer Mathews: At age 39, Dee finally learned what was wrong. Dee Register: I've got medical proof that shows that I'm not an airhead. I just learn differently, and it takes me a lot longer. Jennifer Mathews: Dee has dyslexia. She recently found help with a program that teaches phonics-based reading. It's typically aimed at kids. Lynn Flowers: We can teach older dyslexics all the same skills that we can teach a child. Jennifer Mathews: Phonics teaches basic language decoding skills -- the sounds letters make, and how they work together. Lynn Flowers: Children who have dyslexia as well as adults who have dyslexia, need maybe more practice than others, but they also need to be taught these basic building blocks very, very carefully. Jennifer Mathews: Brains of dyslexics have less activity in language processing regions compared to normal readers. Now, a new study shows the phonics tutoring not only improves reading skills but actually boosts that brain activity. Lynn Flowers: They were making changes in being able to hear sounds and how the language worked. Jennifer Mathews: When Dee started the training, she was reading at a fifth grade level. Now, she's at college level and pursuing her dream of becoming a nurse. Dee Register: I'll get that degree one day. Nobody's is going to stop me from getting that degree. Jennifer Mathews: This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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