New York Times bestselling author of "Honeymoon With My Brother" shares love lessons from around the world.
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Franz Wisner: Hello! My name is Franz Wisner and my book is How the World Makes Love. Believe it or not I am the professional dumpy and that several years ago I was dumped _ by my fiance. So I went ahead and had a wedding without a bride and drank all the wine, and then decided to go on my honeymoon to Costa Rica and I took my brother Kurtz as a substitute. We had such a good time in Costa Rica that we decided to extend the honeymoon. We hit the road, just to go talk to people about love, dating and marriage. My brother and I selected seven countries around the world; Brazil, Botswana, Nicaragua, New Zealand, Egypt, India, the Czech Republic. The world really helped me see love and relationships in a completely different way. It really helped me with my own relationship. The most successful relationships we saw that were relationships that were grounded on things like family, faith, friendship, appreciating assets, if you will. Things that keep better as oppose to things like no wealth, or the appearances. Overall, you know, and specially in the Arab world a lot, you know, family is such a huge component of love, whereas here, we very few of us really talk to our parents about our relationships. For me, one of the big takeaways from that was I do need to involve my family more in my relationship. I didn't in the past. I am trying to do some now. You know the book is filled with love lessons from all over the world. But one that really struck me, I learned in India, and that I met an elderly woman over there and she said, go around Indian, ask people if they loved each other on their wedding day. And almost to a person, they said, no that's not possible that love is only something that can be gained through time, commitment, work and she said, you know, you in America, you tend to see your wedding day as a high and tend to see you wedding day as a mansion. We here in India, see it little bit differently. She said this. Almost when you get married, don't see your wedding day as a mansion, she it as a vacant lot, in that way, you pick up the shovel and get to work.

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