Dr. Lisa on The Morning Show Video

Dr. Lisa Masterson joins The Morning Show to discuss fibroid tumors and other women's health issues.
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[Music Playing] Mike: Welcome to another edition of The Doctor Is In, every Tuesday our panel of MDs tackle questions from our studio audience about health and wellness issues. Juliet: Our first question comes from a woman wondering if postponing surgery is threatening to watch. A few years ago, doctors noticed Rachelle Chase had fibroids tumors in her uterus that in her case were non-cancerous. Rachelle Chase: They would come back and say, oh they tend to grow. We will just keep a watch, we will just keep an eye on them. Juliet: The 45-year-old had none of the troubling symptoms like pain. So doctors weren’t initially concerned. Rachelle Chase: It really was only about four years ago that I really started noticing them. Juliet: But the fibroids grew, so now they looked like this in an MRI, almost entirely willing for uterus, and it’s so bad, it’s starting to show on the outside, a belly bulge. Rachelle Chase: I can pass it off if you are looking at me straight on, because it’s not a waist, but then if you look on the side, it’s like it looks like a sea horse then, so I am kind of uncomfortable. Juliet: Without any immediate medical concerns, Rachelle has hesitated to have surgery, but she is worried that the bulky fibroid mass could be causing damage to her other organs. Rachelle Chase: I guess my question is by not having surgery what damage could I be doing to my body. Juliet: Rachelle is here with us, thank you for being here today, and also today from NYU Medical Center we have Dr. Mark Siegel with us and from the show The Doctors, OB/GYN Dr. Lisa Masterson is here as well. Juliet: Rachelle, good to have you here. Rachelle Chase: Thank you! Juliet: So you are very concerned obviously about your health and you are thinking about may be surgery? Rachelle Chase: That’s what I saw that in MRI and I said, wooh, this is kind of a shock. Juliet: Are you in pain? Rachelle Chase: No, no pain at all. Juliet: No pain at all, mental pain, mental anguish? Rachelle Chase: Not really, I don’t even think about. Mike: And here is a typical man thing to say, and I apologize. Well, it seems to me you would have this removed. Why not you? Rachelle Chase: No, I don’t want to because I am afraid of surgery for one thing, but mainly because I don’t have any symptoms. I mean most of the stories that I have read about people whose quality of life improves it’s because they have major symptoms and pain and I am fine. Juliet: Okay, Dr. Masterson, what is a fibroid, because we hear the word tumor and it’s like wow? Dr. Lisa Masterson: Rachelle is not alone at all, because this is so common, I get asked about this on the street, everywhere in my office, basically fibroid tumors are benign tumors, they grow in the uterus, and basically the cells just don’t know to stop and they just keep growing. So they are not cancerous, but they can cause problems like bleeding, which can cause anemia, which can cause transfusions that are necessary, or death if the heart can’t pump. It can cause pain, not pain in your instance, but they can get so large that they can cause a decreased quality of life because of the pressure. Because if you get up and Rachelle gets up, you can really see from this side, this is her fibroid, this is not her belly, this is fibroid right in here. Mike: What’s it? What other organ -- Dr. Lisa Masterson: And that’s heavy, and it’s causing obstruction. This is you, this is you, that’s the criteria you fit in, so the question is, should you do something? Yes, you should, but what should you do? It used to be a one-size fits all, we used to just hysterectomy everybody, but now you have so many more options, myomectomy which is just the fibroids, lot more options and that’s what you need to talk. Juliet: Dr. Siegel. Dr. Marc Siegel: I agree completely. I would like to admit that I see a lot of women that come in with a blood loss and anemia, that’s a big problem for me as an internist. And I want to say from the start in the old days, docto

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