Donor Ankle Implant Video

This health video focuses on transplanting bone and cartilage from a cadaver donor, just like is done for other donor transplants.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: Glenn Bramble loves his motorcycles despite an accident 26 years ago. Glenn Bramble: The motorcycle went down on the left side and my toe was twisted, my whole foot was turned around backwards, and it was actually four separate breaks and a dislocation of the ankle. Jennifer Matthews: The injury hasn't stopped Glenn, but it has continued to cause problems. Glenn Bramble: It's gotten to the point where there's no cartilage at all, it's just bone on bone and it's quite a discomfort. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors suggested fusion, a common treatment that limits movement. Orthopedic surgeon Mark Myerson has been offering patients something different. Dr. Mark Myerson: We're actually transplanting bone and cartilage from a cadaver donor, just like is done for other donor transplants. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Myerson says for patients who are younger and more active, this procedure offers a better alternative. Dr. Mark Myerson: The big thing about that is it gives you movement unlike an ankle fusion. Jennifer Matthews: One disadvantage is waiting for a donor. On the day of surgery, Glenn learned about another potential problem with the procedure. Glenn Bramble: One of the tendons attached to the joint had developed a bacteria and Dr. Myerson said they were not going to be able to use it because of the bacteria. Jennifer Matthews: Glenn will have to settle for a traditional ankle replacement, but he's not letting it dampen his spirits. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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