Dimensions of Reality Part 2/5 Video

Meet Dr. Recep Yaparel, psychologist and professor of Religion at Dokuz Eylul University, who believes that our reality is split into 4 distinct ecologies - physical, social, cultural and transcendental. Part 2/5.
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Male: So for Dr. Yafarell, there are certain sets of questions that people are able to ask and answer with one of the ecologist, which is social. Dr. Yafarell: In that social ecology, needs to answer to some social questions. For example, he needs to answer who he is? Or she is? He tries to define himself or herself in a social context. These social context includes family, friends, peer groups, and other social systems. Male: According to this theory, there are four distinct ecologies or levels of being and knowing. Dr. Yafarell: The other one of these four ecologies is cultural ecology. Male: In the area of cultural ecology, people are concerned with what the roles and responsibilities are. Dr. Yafarell: People, at the same time try to find answer to questions like this, what do I have to do in a daily lives? What are my own responsibilities related to this social life? So the cultured or cultural system puts some solutions in front of the person to find the right question. Male: For Dr. Yafarell, it’s important to ask the right questions appropriate to the ecology or level of reality we are in. Dr. Yafarell: In the process of selection, people can make some mistakes, maybe. So it is important to find the right ones, to select the right ones from many different answers or solutions. Male: There is, for Dr. Yafarell, one ecology that is essential to fully understanding reality. Dr. Yafarell: If these three different ecologies cannot be seen as sufficient solutions to hold human life. So the theorist adds to these three ecologies the other one which is the transcendental ecology. Male: According to Dr. Yafarell, we are able ask and find answers to our most daunting questions about life in the area transcendental ecology. Dr. Yafarell: In that ecology, the theorists think that people need to find right answers to this questions, why am I here in this world? Why was I created? Male: It is in the realm of transcendental ecology that we can access our most difficult existential questions. So the transcendental ecology, people struggle with some questions in relation to the meaning of life. Male: It is in the area transcendental ecology that we are able to grapple with spiritual, religious, and philosophical questions. Dr. Yafarell: For example some philosophical solutions or religious, spiritual ones, can be found only in that ecology. Male: For Dr. Yafarell, the four ecologies of a value and understanding the world. Dr. Yafarell: I think the first rule in searching for meaning in life is to ask the right question at the right ecology. Male: He points out an important strategy when employing the four ecologies to understand life. Dr. Yafarell: Each of ecologies can answer to right questions. So it’s very important in struggling or in searching for meaning in life to ask right question at the right ecology. Male: For Dr. Yafarell, asking and answering the questions at the appropriate level is paramount. Dr. Yafarell: For example, we cannot find an answer for our physical problem at the transcendental ecology. Or we cannot find right solution or answer about the social problems at the cultural ecology. Male: While living in each ecology can help us ask and answer the questions appropriate for that ecology, a holistic approach to life makes the most sense according to Dr. Yafarell, because each of the ecologies are related and interdependent on one another in some way. Dr. Yafarell: So the holistic approach to life is very closely related to find answers for all ecologies at the same time. So there is a close relationship between these different ecologies. For example, we need to satisfy our primary needs first in order to be able to find the right answers, for example for spiritual ones, maybe. So we cannot separate these ecologies or dimensions of life from each other.

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