What if you could diagnose Alzheimer's in the time it takes to make breakfast? For the five million folks living with Alzheimer's, this is a Godsend. All you need is 15 minutes, and a pencil.
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Casey Taylor: Like mother, like daughter. These two women share an incredible bond. Tracey Manz: My moms the brightest woman I've ever, ever met, bar none. Geneva Marcum: She's the best thing. Tracey Manz: We're the bestest of friends. We've always been. Geneva Marcum: She's always there for me. Casey Taylor: Geneva's going to need her daughter even more, soon. She's suffering from Alzheimer's. Geneva Marcum: You start out, you find yourself lost and you have to ask for help and that's hard. Casey Taylor: Geneva's mother and three brothers have all dealt with Alzheimer's. The family history includes physical exams, cognitive tests, brain scans and blood tests that help determine the cause of memory loss. Dr. Douglas W. Scharre: Patients don't come to their doctor to complain, I got memory loss that they might with a sore thumb. So they put it off, they think they don't have a problem. So they don't tell the doctor and the doctor has no clue. Casey Taylor: Dr. Scharre of the Ohio State University developed this simple, free test. It asks patients to identify pictures, draw, and test their memory. Problems here suggest signs of Alzheimer's. Struggling with the visual and spatial skills on the test could mean dementia and issues with planning and problem solving point to medication interactions. Doctors can interpret the results in less than a minute. Dr. Douglas W. Scharre: You can just look at it and clearly see that it's clearly wrong or clearly right and you'll get a gestalt that they're not really doing well. Casey Taylor: Geneva took the test for us, answering nine out of 22 questions correctly. Missing just six questions is a red flag. Geneva Marcum: I could have done a lot better than that. I know that. Casey Taylor: Dr. Scharre says Geneva has trouble with calculations, word finding, problem solving and memory. While about with Alzheimer's is frightening, Geneva will always remember who to call-on for help. Geneva Marcum: I don't ever forget my daughter's name. Casey Taylor: I am Casey Taylor reporting.

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