Sharon Schwarz discusses treatment changes in the field of diabetes over the years.
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Question: How have diabetes treatments changed over the years? Sharon Schwarz: Actually I have been a diabetes educator for 15 years, and I have been here at the Molk University for 10 years. Certainly over the years I have seen a lot of changes on all for the positives so things are getting better and better for the management of diabetes. In the past we had some older insulin's that peaked in the middle of the night and it could cause seizures with the children. They had to eat a really big snack before bed and their parents would stick in the room in the middle of night and checked her blood sugars to try to make sure that it was at a safe level and the parents had to really worry a lot about hyperglycemia or a low blood sugar at night. Now there is newer insulin that doesn't peak in the middle of the night. There is Lantus insulin that they give at night that is a little bit of insulin all the time and then they give a short, quick, acting insulin every time the child eats, and that's much more like on pancreas. So that insulin doesn't peak in the middle of night. I would say that's the best advancements since I have been doing diabetes, because that's huge the parents are typically very afraid of low blood sugar and especially at night when the child can tell you symptoms so having those newer long adient once that don't peak in the middle of the night is a life saver, they also the blood glucose meter is keep getting smaller and smaller and the -- sets gets finer the meals that they stick their finger with, so that gets better for the kids and certainly the insulin pens and there is just a lot we have lots of tricks to help the kids, so we try to ask them what is the hardest part what's the worst part of having diabetes, because that very well may be that we have a tool to help them or a trick that would help them to feel better about that particular area and make a little bit easier for them. Diabetes and children: The hardest part Sharon Schwarz: Overall I would say probably the shorts you know and they may say some of our kids were try to and other biggest thing is food, so they are going to say giving up some of the food not always, but you know they can be, but I would say overall would be the shorts, would be the most difficult part, but they keeping making the insulin syringe needles shorter and finer. So even that's getting better and we have gadgets that we can put over the syringe were they don't even see the needle and we have insulin pins that the kids load their insulin inside of here so when they are out about with their friends specially our teenagers typically have an insulin pin so that when they eat their meals they just give their insulin with the pin when they eat and then they have their short that drop with the syringe with their long adient one at night, they keep making things better for their kids.

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