Dr. Jyothinagaram talks with icyou about the growth of reported cases of diabetes in the world.
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Dr. Sathya Jyothinagaram: I am an endocrinologist. Well, in endocrine what I do is of diabetes. Diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder. It's been tremendous the increase in the incidence of diabetes over the last 22 years and you can see there's not just here in the U.S., but the world over and a lot of that this is mainly due to lifestyle changes. I think as the world has become more prosperous, I think people are kind of gone away from the kind of lifestyles they're used to lead in terms of eating, exercise and if you look at what has happen to the number of people being overweight, obese in this country you know as the obesity rates have increased, diabetes as a kind of follow did about three to five years behind. Prevalence of diabetes Dr. Sathya Jyothinagaram: I mean diabetes is amongst every one of us. I mean you just got to look behind me and see and if you ask anybody if diabetes has touched them or in the immediate family member, and I am sure probably you know 30%-50% of them would definitely say yes. Question: Diabetes, what needs to happen to reverse this trend? Dr. Sathya Jyothinagaram: There is a lot going on in terms of finding new drugs, new classes of drugs to help with diabetes management or different delivery of insulins is important, but really if you look at what makes the greatest impact, I think it should be lifestyle. I think we need to walk more, not on just once a year, during the ADA walk, but you know on a daily basis and we need to consume less in terms of portions I think. One of our big problems is that we just eat too much and as when you go out to eat, if you look at the portion size, what's happen look at the restaurant portion size? In the last 20-30 years, you can see how it does steadily going to increased. So, I think that is the biggest single thing that we can do to lower diabetes. Question: Can diabetes be deadly? Dr. Sathya Jyothinagaram: It can be very deadly. The problem is people always assume as you know, I think it is not just the general public but physicians are always also kind of dismiss diabetes in a touch of sugar or something the way, just going to minimize diabetes as a problem, but people don't going to connect the big problem of diabetes as it causes heart disease. So if you look at people with heart disease, almost 60-70% of all diabetics die from heart disease and diabetics have like you know 200-300% increase risks of developing heart diseases stroke. So when it somebody has diabetes or high blood pressure and cholesterol, and then five to ten years down the road, they develop a heart attack. Then they get so focused on the heart disease, they forget what caused the heart disease in the first place it was their diabetes or the cholesterol or the high blood pressure. So that's why diabetes is a very problematic, I mean more than 50% of all hospital admissions have either diabetes or have high blood sugar during the hospital stay. So I think it just gets pushed into the back drawn of you known person's consciousness or the general public consciousness. If you look at heart disease and look at stroke you know kidney failure, diabetes is the number one cause of adult blindness in this country. Diabetes is the number one cause of kidney failure, end-stage renal disease in this country. Diabetes is the number one cause of all non-traumatic amputations, because of vascular disease. Diabetes is like a number one for some many other medical problems. I think diabetes then becomes like it gets pushed into the backgrounds that people don't realize.

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