Diabetes Devices That Help Make Insulin Injections Easier Video

Caring for a child with diabetes can be challenging. Here are some tips on using devices that can help make getting injections easier.
Read the full transcript »

Simple Tips to Prevent and Treat Prediabetes Hi, I’m Dr. Fran Cogen an expert in childhood and adolescent diabetes. As you know, caring for a child with a chronic illness such as diabetes requires many, many routine items to perform such as checking blood sugars and giving in some injections. One of the ways to minimize the discomfort in managing your child is to use little tiny devices that might help to avoid some of the discomfort that your child might feel when receiving injections. The three devices that I would like to show you are the shotblocker, insuflon, and iport. Let’s talk a little bit about the shotblocker. The shotblocker is an inexpensive device that will act in way to deflect pain when receiving an insulin injection. I liked to compare it to a inexpensive form of acupuncture. These devices maybe obtained on the web. Please feel free to look at my blog describing these devices for the specific website. The other two devices that you can see are the insulfon and the iport. These are devices by which place into your child’s subcutaneous tissue similar to a catheter that one might use in an insulin pump. You simply then inject insulin syringes with the form of insulin that you’re using into this device and thus avoid giving your children injections in different areas of the body. The only caveat to this is that if you’re using a basal insulin, such as Lantus or Levemir, you will need to give this insulin subcutaneously elsewhere. Therefore, we would recommend using the insuflon or the iport for rapid-acting insulin only. I strongly recommend that you consider using these devices as your child maybe more willing to adapt the insulin therapy. I hope these devices will be helpful in managing your child with diabetes and may in some way decrease the discomfort associated with insulin injections. As always, speak to your healthcare provider about specific information related to these small devices.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement