In this medical video learn about the latest breast cancer screening methods.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: Brenda Rosier has had mammograms before. Her thoughts? Brenda Rosier: Cold. Hard. Painful. Jennifer Matthews: A mammogram is the most common procedure used by doctors to find breast cancer, but it's not the only way. One new option is a procedure known as Ductal Lavage. Mary Parham: If you got used to it, it's just like having your annual pap smear. Jennifer Matthews: The procedure doesn't require any injection or needles. Patients say it only causes mild discomfort. Breast cancer starts in the cells that line the breast or milk duct. With a catheter, doctors collect and test these potentially dangerous cells, locating the disease before a lump develops. Dr. Richard Elledge: Up to now, it's been not possible to sample the cells that cause breast cancer in the breast, because they haven't been accessible. Jennifer Matthews: Another new screening option is a breast MRI. Dr. Claudia Berman: If there's an abnormality found, we're more likely to be able to assure that it's a cancer and the woman is less likely to have a biopsy that's unnecessary. Jennifer Matthews: The MRI provides clearer images of dense breast tissue, diagnoses implant rupture and helps determine how far the cancer has spread. Sue Cannavo took the test. Sue Cannavo: It did find an abnormality but it was a benign cyst. Very relieved about that. Jennifer Matthews: That's good news no matter which test you take. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement