Debunking Skin Cancer Myths Video

Rhiannon and Patricia talk about skin, health, and beauty.
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Debunking Skin Cancer Myths Rhiannon Ally: Welcome back to Better. Joining us today for our hot topic segment, we have dermatologist Dr. Wexler and she’s going to dispel some of those skin cancer myths. And I think one of the biggest ones -- we’re in the fall now and a lot of people think you don’t have to worry about skin cancer anymore now that summer is over, is that true? Dr. Patricia Wexler: That is a huge “no”. Do you know you get UVA 365 days a year? Rhiannon Alley: Wow. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Rain or shine. Rhiannon Alley: So that means we need to be wearing sun screen all year long. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Everyday, whether you’re indoors or outdoors. You know florescent light has UVA? Rhiannon Alley: No, I had no idea. Dr. Patricia Wexler: And sitting by a window you're getting UVA. Rhiannon Alley: Wow, so if you have a window in your office, it’s next to your desk or sitting under lights like this. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Sitting under lights you're getting all of it. Rhiannon Alley: I didn’t put any on today. Dr. Patricia Wexler: That’s right. Rhiannon Alley: Okay, so we got to wear sunscreen. Now here’s as very common one. And I've heard that the correct answer to this but people still never believe me. We all hear SPF 15 versus 30 versus 45 people, think that the higher number means it's stronger is that true? Dr. Patricia Wexler: The number means the amount of time you can stay in the sun without getting sunburn. Rhiannon Alley: So they're all the same as far as strength? Dr. Patricia Wexler: They're all the same as far as strength except they're not as far as the amount of time you can stay in the sun. And believe it or not there's a difference between a 30, a 50 and a 70. Rhiannon Alley: Really. Dr. Patricia Wexler: And we now have learned that after two hours your sunscreen is no longer stable in the sun which is ironic because the sunscreen is supposed to be stable in the sun. Rhiannon Alley: Right, but after two hours it's not. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Two hours it's not. Rhiannon Alley: So you really need to get out of the sun. Dr. Patricia Wexler: You have to reapply if you're going to be in the sun. Rhiannon Alley: You can reapply, well that’s good. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Yes. Rhiannon Alley: So what are some other common myths that you hear? Dr. Patricia Wexler: Well everybody hears that you need Vitamin D to prevent getting this cancer and you can only get Vitamin D from the sun. That’s true but you only need 10 minutes on your arms and legs three times a week. So anybody who’s using it as an excuse to get sunburn is going to get cancer not prevents it. Rhiannon Alley: Oh, yikes. So you only need 10 minutes three times a week. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Ten minutes three times a week arms and legs. Rhiannon Alley: Okay it’s for the kids too. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Kids too absolutely. Rhiannon Alley: They don’t need any more than the adults. Dr. Patricia Wexler: No, and that could be with sunscreen. You don’t have to get burned. Rhiannon Alley: I have no idea, I thought -- okay. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Well you know you can get add sunburn or tan and you get a tan with sunscreen. It's is a late sun reaction. Rhiannon Alley: Really? Okay, so you can still get your sun tan in just a few minutes that are good know. Dr. Patricia Wexler: Yes. Rhiannon Alley: So what are some other common ones as we’re heading in the -- now that we’re in the fall? Dr. Patricia Wexler: Well the other myth is that having a darker skin tone will protect you from skin cancer and actually to some extent having more pigment in your skin protects you from burning. But if you get skin cancer it’s usually diagnosed at a much later stage and it's got a higher mortality. Rhiannon Alley: Why is that? Is it because they don’t realize it? Dr. Patricia Wexler: They don’t realize they have it, so actually if you have dark skin use sunscreen and go for checkups more frequently. Rhiannon Alley: Wow, so what are the different -- are their any differences between how p

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