Debating the Effect of Professional Stunts on Children Part 2/2 Video

People frequently post their dangerous, life-threatening stunts online. The Doctors debate the dangers the videos can promote with stunt video producer Leroy Patterson.
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Leroy Patterson: We do the stunts, so no one else has to. That was though their philosophy, and doctors, especially you; you have this astute view on everything, you only see the bad. No one would ever walk into an ER, say, hey! I just pulled up and stunt and I am totally okay. Dr. Travis Stork: Hold on real quickly Leroy, because we have some younger gentleman in the audience. How old are you guys? Male Speaker: Thirteen. Dr. Travis Stork: You're thirteen. What's your reaction when you see that? Male Speaker: It's pretty funny. Dr. Andrew Ordon: It's funny, but isn't it more scary than funny? Male Speaker: Yes. Dr. Jim Sears: That's the problem Joe, it's -- it looks fun, doesn't it? Dr. Travis Stork: It doesn't really scare you, right? Male Speaker: No. Dr. Lisa Masterson: See that's the problem in and of itself, because it should be scary, because it has a potential. And see this is what you're exposing kids, who don't know and are still in the process and who have underdeveloped minds or making decisions from what you are showing them. Because anybody who see somebody's hair letting on fire, should realize, they're going to get second or three third-degree burns or die. Anybody who falls from building has a potential to die, but when they're that young, they think they're invincible. And so you are putting them in harms way. Dr. Jim Sears: Beyond that, is just a fact that they say, hey, if I put a video like this on myself, maybe I can get 10,000 hits, maybe I can get a 1,00,000 hits on my video. And the kids, they almost feel like, hey! I could become famous. I could be the guy that jumps off the building therein, and walked away. Dr. Travis Stork: And to wrap this up Leroy, why I wouldn't disagree with you that maybe we as doctors do see obviously the catastrophes that happen, I would argue that you actually see it the other way. Since you don't work in the ER, since you don't spend Friday nights there with me, I think you're the one with this astute perspective. And I would invite you to spend sometime in a trauma unit. Leroy Patterson: I would happily do so. Dr. Travis Stork: And I think that truly would make you think twice about this, but I do appreciate you join us today to state your case. Take care. Leroy Patterson: Thank you. Dr. Jim Sears: I don't know, I see it, almost, see it maybe a drug person is somebody that tends to get kids into drug; something like this is almost as bad. They're getting kids into doing something that is life-threatening. Dr. Lisa Masterson: Just as bad. Dr. Travis Stork: Kids do not have that governor; they do not have that frontal lobe ability to analyze the consequences of their actions. And unfortunately, yes, maybe we're naysayer, maybe we're boring, but that's not cool to me at all.

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