Debating the Effect of Professional Stunts on Children Part 1/2 Video

People frequently post their dangerous, life-threatening stunts online. The Doctors debate the dangers the videos can promote with stunt video producer Leroy Patterson.
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Dr. Travis Stork: Well, we actually have on the phone Leroy Patterson. He produces stunt videos, including the ones that you just saw. So Leroy, I do want to welcome you to the show, thanks for joining us. Leroy Patterson: It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you very much. Dr. Travis Stork: So my concern with this Leroy is, you're actually a professional, trained professionally to be a stuntman? Leroy Patterson: Correct. Dr. Travis Stork: But you're now producing people, do you realize that you're putting them in harms way? Leroy Patterson: All of us are fully trained, we know what we are doing, and we take the safety precaution. That's a thing unfortunately that you don't see half of the time. If you don't see all the safety and all -- everything that we do to ensure a minimal amount. Dr. Andrew Ordon: You're Pros though, but you're -- Dr. Travis Stork: Literally, I disagree doctor, there was nothing safe about that video where the kid tumbles over the -- would he hit his head on that table, he could have been paralyzed instantly for life, losing the ability to breathe, losing the ability to move his arms and legs. How would we worry -- Dr. Andrew Ordon: The life-threatening injuries you can get from that, but he is a professional stuntman, but it's the nonprofessionals, they're going to see this and try to do it. Dr. Jim Sears: And I just typed his name into YouTube, I see dozens of videos on YouTube, anybody can see it, there are no restrictions. Dr. Lisa Masterson: I mean you have to take some responsibility for what you're doing, because kids are exposed to it, people who aren't professionals, and they're putting their lives at risk for something that you're doing. So you do have a professional responsibility if you're a professional in what you're putting out there into the media and exposing people to. Leroy Patterson: I understand the concern, however, and in my opinion it's truly up to the parent to tell the child, this is entertainment, this is not to be done -- Dr. Lisa Masterson: So you don't have kids I take it. Leroy Patterson: No. I've seen kids getting injuries than we have ever gotten in the 16 years that we've been doing this playing football in the backyard. Playing, so are you against the sport of football? Dr. Travis Stork: And Leroy I would not disagree with you. I've taken care of children who have injured themselves doing anything you can imagine. Leroy Patterson: Undoubted. Dr. Travis Stork: But Leroy, let me just interject you. I am an ER doctor, I am the one who takes care of these kids after they have been injured, what you just described, injuring yourself playing football, that's an accident. What you are producing and teaching kids to do is not an accident, it's a guaranteed way to get injured. And I just want to ask you, you are personally responsible that when I'm working in ER on a Friday night and I take care of a 12 year old child who has lost all sensation of their arms and legs, will never be able to eat or drink normally again, because of something that you put on the Internet. How would that make you feel? Leroy Patterson: I think the situation itself is horrible; you never want to see that happen. If someone however, I do not take any personal responsibility, because I mean you would hope that through a strong upbringing, a parent could help dissuade. Dr. Lisa Masterson: How old are you? Excuse me, can I just ask how old you are? Leroy Patterson: I am 27. Dr. Lisa Masterson: Okay, you should really actually know though, and should be taking personal responsibility, that's why there are laws, an age limits on things, because you can potentially harm kids with things if they're exposed to things too early. And so, people need to take personal responsibility and that's what we're trying to tell you. You are in a way directly responsible for some of those injuries.

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