Dealing With Portacath and Drains Video

In this video, Jane talks about her recent mastectomy, including getting around with drains.
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The portacath is just a line like an IV line that goes into the central vessel around my heart so that they can easily access it’s just right under the skin that they can access it and give me my chemo therapy through that or draw blood or do anything they need to do, so that they don’t have to keep sticking me. Because from my—well you can't really see it but I do have bruises and things. They use this arm for four different dozes of the chemo therapy and the vessels got pretty abused really and they didn’t want to use this—my left arm because I’d had the lymph nodes removed in this arm. So the portacath is an excellent option. I don’t feel it it’s a little bit sore right at the entry site that I don’t think that continues. So, oh, no, my bandage just again itch but it will probably come off tonight and then I’ll get to shower. They’re just taking off the excess fluid that’s created from the trauma to that tissue in that area. And as soon as they’re draining less than 30 cc a day they can come out which probably take a week or two. Last time it took longer than two week for my drain to come out and I don’t know it might be different this time. So you’re just going to use to dragging this things around with you. Well, like I said it’s like you have a wig at home I mean if I lie down in stuff, I’m just really messing it up and so I try to keep the wig looking as good as I can and live it for wearing out, you know, to work and that sort of thing. I’m over 50 and once you reach that magic age of over 50, you really don’t care what people think too much. So, you know, it’s me and you going to have to get use to me in my little purple cap then I have blue too but I can't find it right now, I don’t know where it is.

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