Dacryocytitis - Blocked Tear Duct Video

Steven Rosenberg MD Pediatric Ophthalmology . www.DrMDK.com
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Host: A very common question to the pediatricians is, my baby has a discharge in the eye, it's not red, it's wobbly, it's a little baby and there is just some part of tear duct being blocked, what is that? Dr. Steven Rosenberg: About 1 in 20 kids are born with a problem of their tear ducts being blocked and when we mean the tear ducts, we don't mean the part that produces the tears, part of the tears are out of the eye, kind of like if you have ever seen people blocked up. This could happen to your child usually from birth, sometimes essentially, we talk about they are few months of age. But most of the time it will get better on itself and however you need to do some massage of the area, in order to make sure that no infection happens and if it does not go away as long in usually about a year of age or so, we do recommend surgery for this. Host: What percent of kids undergo surgery? Dr. Steven Rosenberg: The percentage is probably about 1 in 20 kids end up with a surgery. Most of them will go away on their own . Host: And this surgery, will it ensure so you could tell? Dr. Steven Rosenberg: The Surgery involves -- different people do it different ways, but most people do it under general anesthesia and that's what I am telling you, in general anesthesia, your child doesn't need to go to the hospital, doesn't need to get general anesthesia for a short period of time, there is a--, we put a blunt instrument down to open up the area. And you get no scar left of the skin and there is a little bit of maybe change, a little bit of blood change that comes out of the nose just afterwards but then the child recovers and usually about 95% of the time, it's that with the age they recover from this surgery and have no further problems. About 5% of the kids do have to have gone on to more involved procedures, that are too sound or getting other procedures in order to open up the problem. Host: So basically, it's more of the reliable condition for most patients? Dr. Steven Rosenberg: For most patients, it's a minor condition and even the surgery is about a very minor surgery if you do need it, but it doesn't involves anesthesia.

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