In this medical video learn how medical students are now using two state-of-the-art technologies to look over the shoulder of an experienced surgeon, instead of having to crowd into the operating theater.
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Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Robert Spetzler is one of the world's leading neurosurgeons. Today, he is repairing an aneurysm in this patient's brain. Doctor Spetzler is also a teacher. But his students aren't here in the operating room, they're down the hall, in a cutting-edge classroom, viewing every detail of the surgery on huge TV screens. They say it's actually better than being there. Ruth Bristol: This is pretty cool. I think it is a great opportunity. Jennifer Matthews: Residents used to cram into the operating room to catch just a glimpse of a procedure. Now microscope cameras capture every nuance and video conference screens bring students and teachers face-to-face. Robert Spetzler: I can actually make eye contact and get a feel for the question, it's more of a personal relationship. Jennifer Matthews: In the future, the technology will assist ER doctors at other hospitals. Stephen Papadopoulos: What we really do is teach, and this MedPrescence technology extends our ability to teach the world. Jennifer Matthews: But for now, the medical students of today are using this new technology to become the surgeons of tomorrow. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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