Creating a New Immune System Video

Learn about a new research showing that potent medicines used to prevent transplant rejection may one day be a thing of the past in this medical report.
Read the full transcript »

Dr. Susan Sharma: This is insidermedicine in 60. From Boston, new research shows that potent medicines used to prevent transplant rejection may one day be a thing of the past. The research involved inactivating the patient's immune system, creating a new immune system through the use of donor bone marrow, and finally transplanting a donor kidney. The process was applied to 5 cases of kidney transplantation and 4 of the 5 were able to stop taking immunosuppressing drugs and kidney function has remained stable. From New York, eating sushi more than a few times a month can be unhealthy. A recent study evaluating sushi grade tuna from 20 restaurants has shown surprisingly high levels of mercury. In fact, eating 6 or more pieces of bluefin tuna may lead to mercury levels that are above those deemed acceptable by the EPA. And finally, back to Boston, while aspirin may lower the risk of colorectal cancer by 20%, its long-term risk outweighs its benefits. In a study of over 50,000 people, aspirin taken twice a week or more significantly lowered the risk of developing colorectal cancer, but the effect was only noted in those who took the medicine for more than 6 years. The risks of taking aspirin should be carefully considered before taking it to prevent colorectal cancer. For insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement