WASHINGTON, D.C. – For young children, the home is a playground, and while many parents childproof to ensure that their home is a safe place, some may not be aware that TVs, furniture and appliances are hidden hazards lurking in every room.
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[Video playing: 00:00:00 - 00:00:10] Recent deaths have prompted the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to once again remind parents and caregivers about the hidden dangers of televisions, heavy furniture, and appliances. CPSC staff estimates that in 2006, 16,300 children, 5 years and younger were treated in emergency rooms because of injuries associated with TV, furniture and appliance tip-overs. Between 2000 and 2006, CPSC staff received reports of 134 tip-over related deaths. Additionally, CPSC staff is aware of at least 30 media reports of tip-over deaths since January 2007 involving children 5 years old and younger. These deaths and injuries frequently occur when children climb onto, fall against of pull themselves up on television stands, shelves, bookcases, dressers, chests and appliances. In many cases, televisions placed on top of furniture tipped over and caused children to suffer traumatic and sometimes fatal injuries. [Demonstration of a TV and bookshelf tip-over with a dummy - 00:00:24 - 00:01:50] Sylvia Santiago of West Haven, Connecticut lost her two year old daughter in a furniture tip-over accident in 2008. Sylvia Santiago: The last conversation I had with her was, Good night mommy! I love you. Next thing I know, at 5 o'clock in the morning I woke up to the sound of the TV falling. I did not know she was underneath it. So, I called her name Janiyah, Janiyah where are you? And I turned around and I just saw her legs under the TV. You just don't think of televisions or bolting your dressers to the wall. You don't think of those things. They don't tell you to do that when you get out of the hospital with your baby. You need a car seat but they don't tell you, when your child starts walking make sure your furniture is bolted down. You may think your home is safe. But everyday things can still hurt your child, like a television. A television can be a child's best friend, but it can also be a parent's worst enemy. The first thing everyone says is where were the parents? That's the last thing I say now, when I hear something happen, because I know from personal experience I was right there and it happened. So, it's a tragic accident and it was no one's fault, because we weren't educated on it. Inez Tenenbaum: Many parents are unaware of the deadly danger of this hidden hazard. I urge parents to include securing TVs, furniture and appliances in their childproofing efforts. Taking a few moments now to anchor and secure TVs, furniture and appliances can prevent a tip-over tragedy later. Dr. Gary A. Smith: The most devastating injuries that we see to children, because of furniture tip-over are injuries to the brain and also when a child is trapped underneath a heavy piece of furniture and suffocates. The majority of furniture tip-over injuries occur in the home to children 5 years and younger, and the most important thing for parents to know is that, most if not all, of these injuries are preventable. Anchor TVs, dressers, bookshelves and other large pieces of furniture. Televisions should be placed on a sturdy, low-rise base and pushed as far back as possible. [Video Playing: 00:04:43 - 00:06:49] Injuries and death often occur when young children climb onto, fall against of pull themselves up on shelves, bookcases, dressers, desks, chests and television stands. Avoid placing remote controls and other items that might tempt kids to climb on top of TVs and other large pieces of furniture. To prevent tip-over hazards, CPSC offers the following safety tips: * Furniture should be stable on its own. For additional security anchor all entertainment units, TV stands, bookcases and dresser to the floor or attach them to a wall. * Place the TVs on a sturdy, low-rise base. Avoid flimsy shelves. * Push the TV as far back as possible. * Place the electrical chords out of a child's reach, and teach kids not play with them. * Keep remote controls and other attractive items off the TV stand, so kids won't be tem

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