Corrective Eye Surgery Explained Video

Pediatric ophthalmologist Dr. David Granet performs corrective eye surgery on 1-year-old Madelyn.
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Female Speaker: I am concerned as a mother that later on in life she won’t be able to do everything that people without the condition can do. I am afraid that you know when she is a teenager she wont be able to drive, then she wont be able to just enjoy certain things that she would if she had normal vision. David Granet : If you are a parent you know how painful it could be to see your kid suffer Taylor and deli’s daughter Madelyn was born with crossed eyes causing her not only to suffer vision problems but embarrassing stares. Now a new surgery is offering her hope. Female Speaker: At birth we could tell that her eyes crossed a little bit and if you look at Maddy’s you can see if they are crossed inwards, they also move around quiet a bit she doesn’t quite focus on anything, my immediate reaction was to cry and call my parents and tell them. Male Speaker 2: How did this happen, why it happened, is there anything that we can do to fix it. David Granet : The thing that we are going to be operating on today, the technical terms esotropia when a child’s eyes are crossed. The world interacts with them differently making her look normal we go a long way to having the rest of the world look at her and see what an adorable little child she is. Our plan is to take Madelyn from crossed eyes to straight eyes and she has got these two muscles on the inner part of her eye that are pulling too hard, we are going to cut them and weaken them and then her eyes are going to straight now. You okay? Female Speaker: Okay nervous but okay. David Granet: You know what it means to be nervous, it means you are normal, okay and so begins what we are doing right now is using these instruments to hook that muscle we talked about that moves the eye in towards the nose. Now you have got the muscle right there and when expose it, I am going to deblog discovering off the muscle. Now this suture is about the thickness of a human hair and we are going to sew the muscle so I am passing the needle through a pretty thin area as we do that otherwise it goes into the eyeball which definitely do not want to do. Now we have got the muscle hooked onto the stitches. Now we are going to get ready cut this muscle off the eyeball. So you can see already that the right eye is straight and left eye is still changing, one to go. Ten minutes ago, she had crossed eyes, ten minutes later she has straight eyes. It’s a big difference I think it makes a difference in her life oh my great, absolutely fabulous congratulations. For all done, she is in the recovery room and do wonderfully. Female Speaker: Look at those beautiful eyes, look at those eyes.

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