This health video focus' on the use of medical marijuana in cases of AIDS sufferers as a form of treatment.
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Jennifer Mathews: AIDS has ravished Gary Fransworth's body. Gary Fransworth: When I would go out and walk to my car, if it was a block away, I would have to stop and lean up against the building, because I feel like I was on fire. Jennifer Mathews: Gary tried multiple medication. Gary Fransworth: It would take about year to year-and-a-half and then they start causing nausea or they're not working. Jennifer Mathews: Then he turned to a highly controversial treatment. Many are against approval of marijuana for medical reasons. Janet Joy: There is this fear that people who use marijuana are more likely to go onto use, more dangerous drugs and especially for kids. Jennifer Mathews: Dr. Donald Abrams is determined to prove it has medical benefits. Dr. Donald Abrams: The first review is that well why would anybody want to study such a toxic substance. It just wasn't something that was in the mindset of the review committees. Jennifer Mathews: When opinions changed, he was ready. Dr. Donald Abrams: Everybody concluded at that time that more research needed to be done and we happened to be there with another proposal. Jennifer Mathews: His first study determined not only was it safe, but there is an added benefit. Dr. Donald Abrams: But what we did see in both the group taking the pill and smoking the marijuana was increased caloric intake and an increase gain in weight above and beyond what the placebo group gain. Jennifer Mathews: On with positive results, Dr. Abrams is taking his search one step further, looking at whether marijuana can treat pain. Dr. Donald Abrams: I think rather than go on feelings, it's nice to have some scientific data. Jennifer Mathews: Scientific proof or not, Gary knows his feelings on the issue. Gary Fransworth: Good, nausea has gone. Jennifer Mathews: This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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