Concerns about High Fructose Corn Syrup Video

Susan K. Schulman MD Author of "Understanding Your Child's Health" explains the dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup
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Concerns about High Fructose Corn Syrup Male: In the 1980s, we've seen to go to -- some people think almost an evil high fructose corn syrup. Why is that bad? Dr. Susan Schulman: Fructose is a natural food sugar that we see in foods and vegetables. And by themselves eating food is not bad for us. They have fructose as the sugar that we eat. They have refined corn syrup into a very, very, very high sweetness level where it’s so cheap and so much easier to sweeten foods that they literally put it in everything. That’s when Coke changed its flavor. That’s when Pepsi got cheap. Because when they started using high fructose concept instead of sugar, regular sugar and it’s been shown that the -- when they absorb the fructose, it seems to bypass parts of our regulatory system and actually the fact that’s formed from that sugar goes straight to the belly. So the fact that Americans are getting fat and a lot of it is hanging over their belt as toned to the high intake of -- it’s probably due to the high intake of high fructose corn syrup. If you look on the packages, every cookie, every chip, every cereal that you eat has a little coding of high fructose corn syrup. And certainly, any real soda, not a diet soda, is loaded with high fructose corn syrup. The result has been that our American public that used to ingesting huge amount of this stuff that not only was high in calories, not only cause hunger because when you eat sugar, it makes you hungry. The calories that it was absorbing -- that you absorb from the high fructose corn syrup go straight to your belly fat. And this is a very serious problem because belly fat is what causes the side effects of obesity. Male: Well, Dr. Henry—Pediatric Endocrinologist always talked about it raises the blood sugar very quickly, make a lot insulin to bring it down, but too much insulin—getting hungry afterwards. And that make you want that triggers for the obesity problem as you’ll a little bit too before. Is that true? Dr. Susan Schulman: Yes, it’s absolutely true that sugar raises your insulin level. And insulin can make you hungry. So you try to have high quality carbs that we eat that are digested more slowly. Meaning starches with the bran and then our starches that are considered brown starches so that takes long for them to be digested. So instead of having a shot of sugar going into the blood stream, little verbals of sugar go in as you digest the starches and that kind of starch does not raise your hunger level. Male: Well, if you look at the label and you see carbohydrate, 20 grams, or 18 grams of fiber, that’s a good chance that glucose load will be not so bad, so it won't raise your bloodstream so quickly. Dr. Susan Schulman: After If you look 18 grams of fiber, well you may see 5 grams of fiber. Male: Well, there are couples of things we can actually find like that. Dr. Susan Schulman: Fiber definitely slows down the digestion and allows the carbs to be absorbed more slowly. And that’s the -- Male: So usually we get the labels. It tracks the carbohydrate. In fact of the carbohydrate and that is how much sugar you have. It also known these is relatively low. You have a better chance like 0328 hungry after you eat it. Dr. Susan Schulman: Yes, but unfortunately they’ll say whole grain on something like Cheerios. And if you look at how many fiber of grams you get with that portion, there's a very low amount. So just hauling on whole grain doesn’t really do your job. You really have to look at the fiber content and see if you get at least three grams of fiber. Male: So you should look at the loads. We’ve seen that “the carbohydrate minus the fiber”. And that’s the net carbohydrate absorbed. And that’s a very important thing I think people should be looking at. Dr. Susan Schulman: Definitely.

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