Su Laurent brings us handy hints and tips to make life easier. In this video she discusses common infectious diseases.
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Sam Norman: As babies and toddlers grow, they come face to face with a whole host of infectious diseases from rubella to chicken pox and from whooping cough to mumps. There are huge amounts of symptoms that us parents have to look out for. Su Laurent, the Baby Channel’s Medical Advisor is here today to try and help you make you sense of all these illnesses, welcome Su. Su Laurent: Hi Sam. Sam Norman: Now there are millions as I said of diseases that kids come across and manifest throughout their development. Su, we start off with hand, foot and mouth disease. Su Laurent: Let’s start with that one. It’s a very common and quite contagious disease, causing little tiny blisters on the tongue and on the lips, on the hands and on the feet. And in fact, although the blisters and quite sort of irritating and a bit tender, the actual illness associated with it isn’t too bad, so often the child not particularly irritable. Sam Norman: Right. Su Laurent: Adults can get it too. It’s caused by a virus, which is a coxsackievirus, depending on you are interested in diagnosis. Sam Norman: I am very interested. What is that when you say? Su Laurent: They are just one of the main, there are thousands of viruses as and all they got names and this particular one is called a coxsackie and it is a particular type of coxsackie as well. It’s very contagious; one of my junior doctors had it recently along with both her twins. Sam Norman: Really, it’s in adults too? Su Laurent: Adults can get it too. And they will have – that she had to stay home, impossible to look after them. And then she had to stay home because she couldn’t come and look after children on the board. But the long day just deals completely with no particular treatment. Sam Norman: And is it related to foot, mouth disease that cattle gets? Su Laurent: It’s nothing to do with that. Sam Norman: Okay. Su Laurent: Yeah. Sam Norman: Right. Now what about, I mean chicken pox? Su Laurent: Yes. Sam Norman: It’s a misery. Su Laurent: It’s a misery or it can be a very, very minor illness. And I think we also just start by saying it’s caused by a virus which is actually in the herpes group of viruses, it’s called herpes zoster 00:01:48 and this virus causes chicken pox and shingles. And it’s quite important to get to be clear what is what. Chicken pox is the first infection you’ll get if you have – get hold of this herpes virus, very contagious, usually affects children and it causes little tiny blisters. First of all, little tiny red spots on the trunk more than on the arms and legs but everywhere of the whole body. Sam Norman: Yeah. Su Laurent: And then these turn into blisters, they are very, very itchy, they crest over and then they will disappear. And they come in crops 00:02:21 all over the body. Sam Norman: They are disgusting, and they sometimes and having huge face, so spin lid tight. Su Laurent: Yes. And they can get, one of the complications is they can get secondarily infected with bacteria. That’s one of the reasons you want to go, take you child to a GP. Sam Norman: Right. Su Laurent: If it was clear that round spot, it use to come in very red, and swollen and tender because that might need antibiotics. It’s a self limiting disease. And if a child hasn’t been exposed to it and is exposed with, they got a very high chance of getting it and that’s why people get chicken pox parties. Sam Norman: Do you still do that? Su Laurent: I still do it. Sam Norman: Right. Su Laurent: That is a vaccine for chicken pox. I’d recommend that adults who haven’t had chicken pox and who are thinking about having children, make sure that they are immune to chicken pox because A, if you get as an adult, it’s a really unpleasant illness, they goes on for longer and it can be really debilitating, and B, if you get it when you are pregnant, and this is very important, it can cause damage to the features in the early part of the pregnancy. Sam Norman: Really, like rubella? Su Laurent: Serious time, it’s l

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