This health video focuses on the new technology that is allowing for clearer MRI scans.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: Charles Cederholm is a prisoner in his own body. Parkinson's disease has left him with everything from tremors to paralysis. Charles Cederholm: I have problems trying to move, I have problems eating, problems trying to get dressed. I have a lot of pain that goes along with it. Jennifer Matthews: Now, Charles and his wife have hope in the form of a brain surgery. But first doctors must take an MRI scan of his brain. Standard MRI' s don't work for everyone. Parkinson's patients like charles often can't lie still enough for the machine to do its job. Carol Johnston: When we're dealing with critical patients or trauma patients, motion is always a concern. Jennifer Matthews: Motion can cause blurred MRI's. For Charles, blurred images could keep him from the surgery he needs. Now, there's something new called the PROPELLER MRI. It allows doctors to track the movement of the patient during the scan and reduce it in the image. Jim Pipe: This technology you can move your head maybe this amount so that we can see that after scanning and correct for that. Jennifer Matthews: The new technology can help Alzheimer's patients and fidgety children. It can also help doctors get very detailed scans of stroke patients in less time, so patients avoid more damage. Thanks in part to this technology, Charles feels good enough about his future to share a joke before his surgery. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement