Pediatrician Dr. Jim Sears shows parents how to tell the difference between an eye infection and harmless goop in their child’s eye.
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Child's Eye Goop Vs. Eye infection Dr. Travis Stork: But one thing that you may want to more attention to is color and that’s what the show is all about. The colors of your health and our first color is yellow. Now, how many of you had ever of the term eye boogers. The only thing eye boogers that bother me is when you have a big one and no one tells you. But when you know when it’s harmless the eye booger or maybe it’s an infection. Dr. Jim Sears: Oh this is a really common issue especially parents with kids. You know, the kids wake up in the morning and their eyes filled with goop and they don’t know, it’s just a sleepy or an eye booger or is sit an infection. There’s actually medical term for eye booger, it's rheum. R-H-E U- M. But I never said that I always call it eye boogers. Yeah but you know basically that mucus in there—it’s a common—that stuff it collects is a combination of mucus, skin a little dust and always collecting in your eye but during the day you blinked and you’re kind of wash it away and never really collects. But at night it sits there and collects and becomes a little collection of a little booger, it kind of looks like this, here. Do you see that? The eye booger usually washes away and that doesn’t come back till the next morning. In an eye infection the mucus comes right back within an hour or two and pretty much as persisting all day and will look more like this. Dr. Travis Stork: That’s more than an eye booger. Dr. Jim Sears: I mean you’ve got stuff from both sides, it’s all boogery. And another side of infection, that’s medical term boogery. But another sign is the eyeball itself will be red and that’s call that conjunctivitis or pink eye that’s more sign of infection. Dr. Drew Ordon: And boy which inherent your pink eye wooh! Dr. Jim Sears: Like because it's really contagious. Dr. Travis Stork: It’s really contagious. Dr. Jim Sears: Highly contagious. Dr. Travis Stork: And in fact you know we don’t always know as doctors whether or not is viral or bacterial, you don’t always need bacterial eye drops. And most cases regardless will resolve in three to five days. Female: So wait a couple of days before you call a doctor and see if comes away? Dr. Jim Sears: I usually like the patients to call me and I’ll talk or ask on how long it’s been there, how bad is it and then decide if they should come in to be seen or not.

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