If you are approaching the end of your pregnancy, it might be a good idea to enroll in a child-birthing class.
Read the full transcript »

Child Birthing Classes Juli Auclair: Hi everyone, I’m Juli Auclair, welcome to Parents TV. As you approach the end of your pregnancy it’s a really good idea to enroll in a child birthing class, you’ll learn the secrets of dealing with the pain of labor and you may even get some pretty good homework at the same time. Parents TV’s Kara Sundlun and husband Dennis House take us to their very first child birthing class. Kara Sundlun: It’s our first night of child birth class and Dennis and I are relieved to meet a bunch of couples as clueless as we are. Lesson one for dad, empathy. I like this. Coach: You’re up at night. You’re not comfortable. Carrying this baby, you gentlemen I want you to try to carry an extra 30-pound backpack 24 hours a day, see what it’s like getting up and getting down and trying to sleep and trying to turn. It’s not easy. This takes a lot of energy. Kara Sundlun: You’ll need the energy for labor but how will you know when it’s really time? Dennis House: For some women, it’s when her water breaks, others when contractions start and coach this is when you need a good stopwatch. Coach: You’ll time contractions from the beginning of one to the beginning of the next. So when you first try to feel that tightening you’ll look at the clock. The contraction itself maybe 30 or 40 seconds. When you feel that contractions start the next time, you’ll look at the clock. Beginning of one to the beginning of the next, talk to your doctors and ask them when should I call you if I’m having contractions? How far apart should they be? Has anyone been told yet? Usually first baby when the contractions are about five minutes apart for one hour but that can vary depending on your pregnancy, your due date, how far you live from the hospital, your family history. Kara Sundlun: So this early phase when you’re talking about that you can be at home and relaxing and your coach will be eating and how long is that supposed to last? Coach: It can be seven to eight hours but the first few hours you may not even realize it’s labor. You may have a low backache, maybe you have some cramping, intermittent contractions but it’s as these hours, these first two hours progressed that you notice things aren’t quite the same. These contractions are getting closer, they’re getting stronger. You may have that bloody show at this time with that mucous blood coming out. You may get a burst of energy but don’t get carried away with that energy and clean the whole house. You need that energy for later. So, the contraction begins, you get comfortable. You consciously relax your body. You find a focal point to look at in and concentrate on; you give that cleansing or signal breath to signal the beginning of the contraction. Taking a big breath in through your nose and letting it out through your mouth. [Demonstration] Kara Sundlun: When the time comes the easiest way for a baby to enter the world is head first. Coach: The easiest way to fit is when they’re looking at that tail bone, they come down, tuck their chin and they could turn that goes down and under and out to say hello. Dennis House: Hi, I’m born. Kara Sundlun: Everyone, the woman and probably the man do is kind of terrified of the episiotomy. Coach: Yes. Kara Sundlun: What is that and do you have to have an episiotomy? Coach: You do not have to have an episiotomy. There was a point in time where it was fairly routine. But at this point now, it’s only as necessary and that the statistics have really dropped. So, much fewer mothers are having it. Dennis House: So, in layman’s terms what is an episiotomy? Coach: Sometimes if the baby’s head is big or if the doctor feels there’s not enough given these tissues or if mom has been working hard, they’ll make an incision. But first they’ll give Novocaine or give an anesthetic to numb this entire area. Kara Sundlun: So you don’t feel this? Coach: Right. At this point, you don’t even feel that anesthetic going in because you’ve got pressures, you’ve got

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement