This medical video focus' on the new trails for chemotherapy, the new technology is an inhaled version of chemotherapy.
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Jennifer Matthews: Radiation Oncologist Gregory Otterson is discouraged every day when he comes to work with lung cancer patients. Dr. Gregory Otterson: I see too many of my patients that don't live long enough. Jennifer Matthews: Today, he's seeing 35-year-old Lisa Fogle. Dr. Gregory Otterson: She has, unfortunately, a fatal disease. Jennifer Matthews: Lisa recently participated in a study with Doctor Otterson. He's testing an inhaled version of chemotherapy. She sat in this tent and breathed in the medicine. Dr. Gregory Otterson: The strategy is to deliver chemotherapy agents directly into the lungs. We want to maximize the delivery to the lungs and minimize systemic toxicity. Lisa Fogle: When you think of chemotherapy, you think of hair loss, sickness, fatigue, there was none of that. Jennifer Matthews: It's too early to know if it will work, but earlier animal studies showed a twenty-five percent response rate. Lisa knows the odds are against her. So, she's spending each moment making memories with 6-year-old Joshua. Lisa Fogle: The hardest part for him to deal with is Mommy could die. He'll ask me, 'Mommy, will it be on a Thursday? Will it be on a Friday?' It's like, well, Josh, only God knows that, but hopefully, it won't be for a long time. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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