Plastic surgeon Dr. Drew Ordon is an old hand at chemical peels, a popular cosmetic procedure performed to refresh facial skin. Several different levels of peels are available, ranging in acidic intensity, and should always be performed by a medic...
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Chemical Peel Dos and Don'ts Dr. Travis Stork: So, let’s talk about chemical peels. They’ve been around for a while and they are very popular, right Dr. Drew Ordon? Dr. Drew Ordon: Well, they are and there are different peels, light peels, medium strength peels and heavy peels. What is chemical peeling going to do? Well, it’s going to eliminate fine lines, dark spots on your face and actually, you may get some skin tightening. So overall, you are just making your skin look better and younger. Dr. Travis Stork: But you need to get it done by a professional, take a look. Dr. Drew Ordon: I’m actually getting ready to do a chemical peel on a patient in one second. But I’ve got a couple of tips for you. If you are considering doing a home peel, there are five don’ts that you have to consider. Don’t peel if you have dark to medium dark skin. You never want to use acid solution greater than eight percent concentration. Do not peel your skin if you are on acne medications. You have to avoid the sun six weeks before and six weeks after any peeling and finally, if you have a history of cold sores, you do not want to do the skin peel on your own skin. Dr. Travis Stork: So, if you do it the wrong Drew, it can cause and make damage? Dr. Drew Ordon: Right. And there are some little new ones to what you saw and in the video there, I’m doing a couple of things that I am applying this, watching for the right amount of frosting which tells you that you’ve reached the right end point as far as how much peeling solution you’ve put on and finally, you can see here what we call feathering. You don’t want to just stop abruptly. So there, you can see the frosting and it’s supposed to be that foggy white appearance that is telling me that that’s the right solution. Eyelids, very thin skin. I did this in about 30%. And now, you are seeing me feather over those crow's feet and this is actually in a guy; more guys are having things done on their face. Dr. Travis Stork: I don’t think I would want to do that at home to myself. Dr. Jim Sears: To put an acid on your face, you got to know what you are doing. Dr. Travis Stork: Because you can have some major issues occur. Dr. Drew Ordon: We have a picture of somebody who did it. What you see here is it’s uneven in certain areas. She is light in other areas, she is dark, she has a very uneven peel and then what happened in her case, she developed cold sores or herpes, blisters on and around her mouth because that’s one of the don’ts that I’ve said if you have a history of cold sores, you don’t want to do your own peel. And she broke out and those cold sores -- Dr. Travis Stork: So, this was her a couple weeks later after that? Dr. Drew Ordon: That’s her a couple weeks later after her peel with that severe herpetic infection which took a while. Dr. Travis Stork: She is not even quite healed yet, is she? Dr. Drew Ordon: No. For her to be right may take months with fade creams. Here is the final result in somebody in conjunction with some eyelids that I did a trichloroacetic acid peel on a 30% solution and this is her several months later but you can see that that really soften those crow's feet, some of that sun damage, brown spots and actually got some tightening of that skin around the eye. Dr. Travis Stork: Thank you sir for those tips.

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