Professional NHL scout Jeff Crisp is spreading awareness about cerebral palsy, a neurological condition that limits a person's ability to move.
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Sherri Dmyterko: In the world of hockey, Calgary's Jeff Crisp is responsible for spotting winning talent. As a professional recruiter for the Stanley Cup Champion, Anaheim Ducks, he is passionate about finding the best players. Off the ice, Jeff is equally passionate about being a dad and a husband, and about helping his young, son who suffers from a neurological condition called cerebral palsy. Jeff Crisp: Around Keele's first birthday he was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, the doctor told us that he had cerebral palsy, and our first initial reaction was devastation and sadness. We quickly reenergized and refocused ourselves to set some positive goals for Keele and help him in anyway we could with his development. Sherri Dmyterko: This winter, Jeff is embarking on a campaign in partnership with March of Dimes to raise awareness of cerebral palsy and taking his personal message to fans at select WHO and OHO rings across the country. Dr. Gerry Keifer is a pediatric surgeon at Calgary's Alberta Children's Hospital. Dr. Gerry Keifer: Cerebral palsy is actually the name for a group of symptoms that lets parents know that their child has had brain injury, either before birth or shortly after birth. The major problem that it causes is tightness in the muscles, which we call spasticity, and it limits the child's ability to move in certain directions. Treatment of children with cerebral palsy involves basically trying to loosen tight muscles, and that can be done both with physiotherapy, with local injections of drugs like Botox or oral medications which also decreased the muscle tightness, and then last but not least, surgery. Jeff Crisp: Keele is three-and-a-half years old and he is doing excellent right now. He is able to walk with the help of a walker. Keele is very motivated to help improve his own mobility, and he is dedicated to everything that we ask him to do. The love of our family and support we have turned it into a family project to help Keele with his mobility, and Botox, physiotherapy, has all aided Keele in his mobility. Sherri Dmyterko reporting.

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