Celiac Disease - Tests Video

Martin D. Fried MD Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition 3200 Sunset AVe Ocean NJ (732)682-3425 www.HealthyDays.info
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Male Speaker: If you will have a primary family member with celiac disease then probably the children that come to that situation should be tested for. Dr. Martin D. Fried: Yes there is a antibody test but there is also a gene test DR8 and DR2 gene profile test. Male Speaker: Having those guarantees you celiac disease or probably like celiac disease. Dr. Martin D. Fried: Gene plus environment so, it increases your chances and having it you can have without the genes but you have to have some kind of something in the environment to trigger it. Male Speaker: So, if you have those genes you are at risk of having disease. If you don't have those genes then you should not going to get the disease? Dr. Martin D. Fried: Less then 1% chance. Male Speaker: So reduces by 99%. Dr. Martin D. Fried: Yeah. Male Speaker: This is probably not the celiac, we haven't found 0:00:56. Okay, if you are going to make a diagnose what would be the best lab testing for a doctor - to at least make the diagnose, what would be the ones you would consider? Dr. Martin D. Fried: If you are doing the blood test in your office there are two blood testing, tissue transglutaminase and endomysial antibodies. In order to do a tissue transglutaminase IGA level they have to make sure that there not IGA deficiency. Male Speaker: If they have IGA deficient, the test won't show anything. Dr. Martin D. Fried: The test won't show I think. So, tissue transglutaminase and the serum IGA level also some level don't do endomysial antibodies, they'll do tissue transglutaminase but endomysial antibodies or IGA and IGG also. Male Speaker: If the person is IGA deficient, what will be the ideal test? Dr. Martin D. Fried: A biopsy, if you suspect, well there are the IGG test this trail exam.

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