Patients taking charge of their treatment. See how these medical professionals are learning to read the needs of their littlest patients.
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Jennifer Mathews: With the tiniest movements and the saddlers Chester’s these pre mature babies guide their care givers. Cathy Daguio: The first step is really recognizing that it’s going well for them or perhaps it’s kind of taxing them a little. Jennifer Matthews: Constant care machines help keep preemies alive. But Doctor Marilyn Sandra says that right environment is also critical. Marilyn Sandra: We shield their incubators we try and keep the sound levels down. We encourage people to talk softly at the bed side. Jennifer Matthews: Specialized grip bumpers help imitate the confines of the womb. Cathy Daguio: Focus is really unbuilding the strengths in everyone and focussing on the ways that we can support that baby who wasn’t mean to be a developing foetus but now it is a person developing outside their mothers womb. Jennifer Matthews: Care givers observe and record as many as 90 different scuttle behaviors. Marilyn Sandra: It is the baby who is sleeping restfully when the care giver comes to the bed sides suddenly, awake. Jennifer Matthews: New research shows that developmentally supported care can speed a pre mature baby’s progress. Cathy Daguio: Bay’s grow faster have few days on IV fluids go home from the hospital faster then baby’s will don’t have the advantage of that care. Jennifer Matthews: Encouraging news from a Lesa Gamble, whose baby Faith was born 11 weeks prematurely and weight less than 2 pounds. Female: No body interspace you did this well. Jennifer Matthews: So while the babies can put into words how they feel and what they need every move makes their point loud and clear. This is Jennifer Matthew’s reporting.

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