Cardiometabolic Risk Animation - Part 3 Video

The International Chair on Cardiometabolic Risk presents demonstrates how cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and obesity are connected.
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Poor eating habits, junk food, traffic jams, a sedentary lifestyle. The 21st Century has marked the transformation of Homo Sapien Sapiens into Homo Obesus Sedentarius, a prime candidate for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemias and a host of related complications. Abdominal obesity has a map and knows how to use it. It is even gaining new ground striking earlier and harder in a full out of song. So much so in fact that the condition is now found in all specialties, endocrinology, diabetology, cardiology, obesology and more. Is the medical community ready to tackle this pandemic whose consequences are already quantifiable? Does it have the necessary tools to diagnose those at high risk? \ For some 50 years, epidemiological studies have shown that the risk of arterial hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease rises with body mass index and with waist circumference in particular. The concept of a metabolic syndrome is increasingly common in clinical practice. But yet to make in routes is the notion of cardiometabolic risk which increases with the patient’s waist size. Cardiometabolic risk encompasses classical risk factors such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and smoking as well as an array of new markers largely caused by abdominal obesity such as elevated triglyceride levels, insulin resistance, high blood glucose, an inflammatory state and low concentrations of good HDL cholesterol. All of these anomalies are commonly called the metabolic syndrome. Abdominal obesity, intra abdominal or visceral obesity in particular must now be seen as a therapeutic target and given the state of things, a priority target at that. It has been shown that an excess of intra abdominal adipose tissue actively participates in the regulation of insulin action in the metabolism of lipids, fats and inflammatory processes. Modern imaging technique such as computer demography have highlighted the key role this intra abdominal fat plays in the development of metabolic anomalies. Understanding is everything. Simply measuring a patient’s waist size can indicate abdominal obesity and corresponding metabolic risk and the results should definitely be included in the patient’s file just like his or her cholesterol level or blood pressure. This capsule was presented by the International Chair on Cardiometabolic Risk. The chair is an independent academic forum that brings together the world’s top specialists and harnesses the multi disciplinary expertise of leading researchers such as Dr. Jean-Pierre Despres, Dr. Philip Barter, Dr. Bryan Brewer and Dr. Peter Libby. And of Mr. Jean-Claude Coubard who serves as Executive Director. Jean-Claude Coubard: For me, the real value and uniqueness of this chair is the fact that we were able to bring together world-renowned experts in their single organization. This is quite an accomplishment given that these experts chose to meet and to share the ideas and expertise. Closely affiliated with Universite Laval, a leader in international research, the chair is headquarter at prestigious Opita Laval which is renowned for the extent of its cardiology, pneumology and obesity expertise. The chair is directed by Dr. Jean-Pierre Despres, Director of Research in Cardiology at Opita Laval Research Center in Quebec City, Canada. Jean-Pierre Despres: The abdominal obesity and type 2 diabetes, if they did mix, it forced us to rethink our understanding of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The international chair on cardiometabolic risk is a focus response to soaring cardiovascular disease rates worldwide.

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