Cardiac Cooling Video

This medical video looks at how to help people with cardiac problems through cooling.
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Darrell Griffin: I don't remember anything except what she told me. Glennda Pyles: When she said, 'I just don't think he's going to make it,' I just wasn't convinced. Jennifer Matthews: By all accounts, 52-year-old Darrell Griffin should not even be alive today, much less be able to make music. Dr. Kennon Heard: His heart was stopped, our estimates are somewhere around 10 to 15 minutes. Jennifer Matthews: Darrell suffered a massive heart attack that landed him in a clinical trial at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. Dr. Kennon Heard: These pads are applied directly to the patient's skin. Jennifer Matthews: In 7 emergency rooms around the country, doctors are testing the Arctic Sun. Like a human radiator, the device pumps water and cools the body ... effectively reducing the risk of brain damage. Dr. Kennon Heard: Using this device, we were able to bring his body temperature down, kept him cooler for 24 hours. And then he had, over the next several days, what we would consider a miraculous recovery. Jennifer Matthews: Often doctors can reboot the heart after an attack only to end up with a brain-dead patient. This could make all the difference. Darrell Griffin: I am just standing here; I was the lucky guy that got the machine first. Jennifer Matthews: While the machine won't save a life, doctors say it shows promise for preserving the quality of it. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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