Cancer survivor Janet MacCallum talks about the treatment that saved her life and how this same procedure is now more commonly used for current patients.
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Jerry Zucker RIDE FOR HOPE Sunday October 26, 2008 Charleston, South Carolina Janet MacCallum Cancer Survivor I was about 26, and at that time they didn't know whole lot, they didn't - you know and I had a protocol treatment that my parent - my father decided I needed to go to, you know, found about it. And it was in the University of Alabama. And I had, not sure of the doctor's name, it's been so long, it's been 22 years and he started me out with the amount of Chemo I had to have, the amount of radiation and also I had to go to my family doctor and get shots in both arms and both legs of radiating cancer cells. That was the beginning of what they are doing now, but they are doing a little - I think they have got a little bit better situation on it than back then. I mean it was a protocol treatment, now it's becoming a treatment. How difficult was cancer treatment? Very difficult, because they don't - now they give the chemotherapy in a different way, I had to have it in my vein and I had to go like once a month and I had to do it - you know it was like a drip-bag and it was done very different and very painful.

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