Ludovico Guarini MD Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship: Columbia University Chief of Pediatric Hematology at Maimonides Medical Center
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Male 1: Another misconception, I give a cancer drug. I am going to get it from cancer. Is that happen? Is that big risk for that? Male 2: The risk of secondary malignancies in the children with cancer and that risk comes from two areas. One is the fact that kids who have cancer may have genetic abnormalities that may lead them to have a second malignancy later on life. The gaining of talking about it is extremely a small numbers, but there is one possibility meaning that the child himself may have some biological reason to have them. Male 1: So, sooner if we share together we do a longer treatment. We follow them. We will pick up more information that are marking better understanding that we will maybe be more selective. How we watch what we do with so we get better results. Is that true? Male 2: That is absolutely true. The standard line that they use when I asked the family to participate in one of their studies is that they should think about the fact the reason why we can offer most children the 80% of the cure rates that we are talking about for some of the cancer and it is because thousands of kids before their time have gone through this studies and have helped us to learn and understand and move forward and get to what we had today. And so, their participation may need those numbers forward.

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