Emma Howard discusses breastfeeding and gives a simple guide to help you nurture and nourish your baby.
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Emma Howard: Hello! I’m Emma Howard, and we are talking about breastfeeding here on the Baby Channel. With me is Heather Welford from the NCT. Heather, you are a Breastfeeding Counsellor and we have been talking to you with a number of other babies at different stages before and now. Now I have got my little one here, Scarlet. Scarlet is my second baby and I found breastfeeding very easy with her but I didn’t the first time with my son, and almost considered giving up with him. I’m very glad I didn’t, but I am told I’m typical, would you say -- well maybe not typical, but certainly it's quite a common experience. Heather Welford: Yeah, people sometimes don’t have a good experience the first time around. They think about bottle-feeding second time around. But you are not untypical, lots of people are like you. They have a brilliant experience the second time around. Things seem to fall into place. If they, perhaps weren’t very well supported or if they had poor advice in hospital with baby number one, they are a little bit more informed with baby number two, and people don’t need to worry that they won’t have time for the toddler and the new baby because with breastfeeding, apart you from this, you have got a spare arm to cuddle the toddler. Build a legoman, read a story, do all sorts of other things but not with the bottle. Emma Howard: No that's very true. I didn't have legoman building up towers but certainly it’s sort of – so it is often more reassurance while you are feeding the second baby and yes, I have that arm and I can cuddle the toddler. That’s true but I think confidence is the key thing though. First time around, you are told it’s natural, you are told that it will all fall into place but so many women don’t find that's the case. I think most women have a difficult start. It’s a learning experience for both you and the baby, isn’t it? Heather Welford: That’s right. All the instincts are there in the baby. The baby is born healthy and energetic, the baby will have sucking and swallowing instincts. Emma Howard: Although some babies can be lazy feeders, can't they? Heather Welford: They can and they may need a little bit extra encouragement and the moms need a lot of support while difficult time is taking place. The mom also needs some information on techniques sometimes to get herself and the baby into a position where it doesn’t hurt because soreness is one of the biggest reasons why women switch to the bottle and it is almost always avoidable with the right technique. Emma Howard: So it's positioning. Positioning is everything. Heather Welford: The attachment of the baby -- the positioning in terms of how the mother is sitting and where the baby is, is less crucial than how the baby takes the nipple and breast -- Emma Howard: How the baby is attached to the breast? Heather Welford: That’s right. Emma Howard: But in terms of sitting. Beside if you are sitting on as perfectly fine seat to have to feed the baby. You don’t need to buy special tap. Heather Welford: You don’t. It’s nice if you can give yourself a nice treat with that but you can breastfeed in any position really as long as you are comfortable and the baby is comfortable. Some mothers learn to breastfeed lying down which is a good way getting you feed them, having the rest to yourself. Emma Howard:And then you can sort of put the foot on to the arm, the football position, especially with twins. I have seen mothers holding their babies’ heads underneath the breast and the body that goes -- Heather Welford: I know it’s very impressive. That way you can two at once. Emma Howard: I am manure of that. Heather Welford: And there are different ways of holding the baby’s body as well but the crucial thing is that mouth open the baby shouldn’t have his chin tucked into his chest. The chin should be touching the breast and the nose normally is free. And that means the head is at least slightly tilt back which gives a good sucking and swallowing position. I mean i

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