Emma Howard discusses the topic of breastfeeding, like how to breastfeed an older baby.
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Emma Howard: Hello! I'm Emma Howard and we're talking about breastfeeding here on the Baby Channel. With me is Heather Welford who is an NCT Breastfeeding Counselor and next to you we've got Tara and four-and-a-half-month-old Ruby who is just latched on, she couldn't quite wait for us. Well, she is enjoying it. She is also pulling up, you're at that stage where she's fidgeting. Tara Wilkinson: Yes, very much so. Emma Howard: Actually, I talked to Heather about the stage that we're watching here. This is a baby who is disparate to breastfed. She is also pulling off and looking around. This is a new stage, isn't it? Heather Welford: It is. Older babies can sometimes be distractable and we kept Ruby waiting. She got a little bit agitated, so she is going to need to calm down a little bit from that moment where she was agitating to be fed. Emma Howard: That's quite true, isn't it? When babies are upset, they don't feed well. It sounds really obvious and when you're rushing about with a new baby and you've left them to go do something else and they get upset, you almost have to have that calming, here we go, a fine example of it, there's no point carrying on, is that? Heather Welford: No. Emma Howard: Calm her down, then put her back again. Well, Ruby, you're demonstrating this musically for us. Tara Wilkinson: She is also tired. Emma Howard: I thought she is. This is right pose, isn't it? Tara is doing fantastically here. Heather Welford: She is, she is responding. She is probably not even consciously thinking about it, are you? Tara Wilkinson: No. Heather Welford: By now four-and-a-half months, they are tuned into one another and Ruby can communicate with Tara really effectively and Tara knows what to do. She just takes her off, calms her down and she is shushing her, nice and gently in area there, that's nice. Getting to a stage where she could probably put her back on again. She is ready to get stuck in on the feed again. Emma Howard: And the fidgeting can happen after how many weeks? Is it quite focused in the beginning? Heather Welford: Well, you can get babies stopping and starting even as newborns, they can get themselves very wound up because they want to feed, they haven't quite yet learned how to put all those instincts into place. A feed of a newborn might last an hour, off and on, off and on, not quite really getting it together. Emma Howard: All babies and mums are different, aren't they? So breasts sort of letdown at different rates. So, I mean, what was going on that? Heather Welford: That's right. Each mother and baby is a unique partnership and if both got to learn how to breastfeed effectively and happily and different things will happen in the birth that might influence the feeding experience. Mothers do breastfeed really lactate milk at different rates. That's why following any book or anybody's advice absolutely slavishly isn't going to help anybody because your baby might not fit that particular pattern, if you know your baby. Emma Howard: That's what you want in the beginning, you want to be told exactly what to do and when to do it, because there is so much to take on board. It's quite hard message to take on really, isn't it, that you were an individual and social baby. Heather Welford: Yeah and being patient, being candid yourself, accepting that everything isn't going to fall in place on the first day. That will help you in paying attention to positioning and attachment. If it hurts, get help with getting the baby on in a way that isn't painful for you and just not expecting to get everything right from day one because for most people it doesn't happen like that. Emma Howard: No. I mean, did Tara have that experience? Tara, Ruby is your first? Isn't she? Tara Wilkinson: Yes, she is. Emma Howard: You seem to be working very well together as a team now. I know that she is overtired and you're very, very, automatically knowing how to calm her down. But when you started and just before she was born, you were

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