Learn about how breast feeding doesn't raise the risk for cavities in younger children in this medical report.
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This is Insidermedicine in 60. From Rochester, contrary to what some may believe, breastfeeding does not raise the risk for cavities. A study of over 1,500 children from two to five years of age failed to link the length of breastfeeding to the risk of developing cavities. However, having a mother who smoked during pregnancy or being from a lower income group, raised the risk of cavities in young children. From Maryland, cat allergies maybe linked to asthma. In a study of over 10,000 people, nearly a third of asthmatics were allergic to cats. In addition, allergies to fungus and white oak were also associated with asthma. From Toronto, the Ontario Superior Court has acquitted three health officials and a pharmaceutical company in a case launched after thousands of Canadians received blood products tainted with HIV and Hepatitis. The Superior Court found that while the events were tragic, the official's actions were not criminal. In 2005, the Canadian Red Cross offered an official apology to patients. Over $1 billion has been set aside by the provincial and federal governments to compensate victims. And finally, back to Maryland, while the majority of health organizations recommend that children only need to eat a healthy diet, nearly one-third of American children under the age of 18 years take a daily nutritional supplement. Most took supplements that contained multivitamins or minerals. The study is important because despite the widespread use of supplements, experts recommend that proper diet remains the best source of nutrition for both children and adults. For Insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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