Breast Cysts Explained Video

Guest breast specialist Dr. Kristi Funk explains the difference between benign and malignant cysts and how you can tell the difference.
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Dr. Drew Ordon: So important for women out there to get this information. First of all what exactly is a cyst? Female Speaker: A cyst is a dilated sac of fluid that develops in the breast tissue and one out of 1000 may have a little bit of weird cells inside so they are predominantly benign. Dr. Drew Ordon: But it is a breast mass and if a woman finds it I mean it can be a big source of stress in concern. Female Speaker: Oh, you can have a woman writing her will then she is just scared of death -- cancer. Dr. Drew Ordon: Certain woman more predisposed to get cysts? Female Speaker: Certain women are, certainly women had it toward menopause. So in your 40s is the most common time to get cysts and then if you are postmenopausal and taking hormonal replacement therapy, that extra boost of hormones will generate cyst in you breast. So very common 50% of women have cyst and 20% can actually feel them. Dr. Travis Stork: So if a woman is feeling a cyst, will she be able to tell the difference between that and it maybe more malignant for her. Female Speaker: You never know. There are a few more common science for example a cyst is very smooth and if you push it, it maybe even kind of bounce away from your finger, where cancer tends to be a little greedier but the truth is always going to be a little imaging study to see if it's filled with fluid or cells. And if it is fluid, it's a cyst, if it's cells that's often to your biopsy. Dr. Drew Ordon: And typically these can occur -- can develop more quickly than other types of masses, is that true? Female Speaker: Very true. Sometimes, particularly ovulation something that would trigger our hormone surge, you can go to bed without it and wake up with it, it is not concerning to me that makes me think it is a cyst, but to the women it's a panic time. Dr. Drew Ordon: Because I know in Rebecca's case she had a mammography back in October, which she was told was relatively clear and then she finds this pretty sizable mass in her breasts that -- it really freak you out. Dr. Travis Stork: Your point is that a cancer doesn't show up overnight. If there is no mass and there is a mass, the next day more likely to be a cyst. Female Speaker: Much more likely to be a cyst, however, there is always that day a woman does feel a mass and it does turn out to be cancer. Yesterday, she didn't feel it, today he did. Dr. Travis Stork: She need to get it checked out. Female Speaker: So she always need to be checked out.

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