Breast Cyst Ultrasound Video

Rebecca, 38, from Los Angeles, California found a cyst in her breast. Dr. Funk performs an ultrasound and determines whether Rebecca’s cyst is benign or cancerous, then drains the fluid out of it.
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Female Speaker: Okay so when I meet someone, I first do an exam. I make sure I can feel the mass and make sure that's the one she is feeling. Then I quickly just do an ultrasound. Should we do it now or --? Male Speaker: Let's do it, sure! Female Speaker: Alright. So when I put the ultrasound probe down on the mass, okay, I'm going to slide this up. Male Speaker: May be a little cold. Male Speaker: This is completely painless to you right now, right? Female Speaker: See, woman, man, you would have cold gel. Male Speaker: I want what my gel, what are you talking about? Female Speaker: Do we want to look at the screen and talk about. Male Speaker: Yes. Female Speaker: Okay, little bit of normal breast tissue there. Male Speaker: Breast tissue right here in the upper part of your ultrasound, correct? Female Speaker: And now when I roll over. Male Speaker: There is the cyst. Female Speaker: That black circle, very sharp borders. Male Speaker: So black is fluid. Female Speaker: Black is fluid, gray and shadowy black can be cancer, but you see how sharp the top and the bottom I could drew it with a pen, cyst. The way you get light going right into this cyst you see that bright white gray underside there. That shows that the ultrasound beam is going through fluid. It can't go through cancer. It bounces back and that's dark. Male Speaker: You've seen a million of these. Your mind you see that, you know. Female Speaker: 100% benign, not worried at all. Male Speaker: Good news, Rebecca. Female Speaker: There is something we can do. We can get rid of that fluid, are you ready? Okay, quick alcohol swab, just to clean the skin. This is how easy it is. Male Speaker: Now, will ever send this fluid for culture and cell count? Female Speaker: I do. I send it when I'm worried on the count. I've to talk to Rebecca for a second. On the count of three, I'll poke Rebecca, one, two, three poke; see that needle. Male Speaker: That is right in that cyst. Male Speaker: Watch the cyst. Basically all that's collapsing. Female Speaker: Disappearing, disappearing! Male Speaker: That is so cool! Female Speaker: There is my needle. Pulling back I'm going to get every little drop out of here Rebecca so it doesn't come back. Male Speaker: Like you're doing okay, right? Male Speaker: You are good, Doc. Female Speaker: Yeah, you are done. We've got a beautiful chocolate color. Male Speaker: Wow! Male Speaker: And just like that. Female Speaker: You are done. The fluid that came out is a nice brownish color. I do sometimes send cyst fluid for analysis. We want to make sure there is no cancer cells inside. So who has a cyst send for fluid analysis and who doesn't? Anybody who is postmenopausal, remember those older ladies. Cysts aren't so normal. I always want to look at that fluid. Other women who have any trace of blood in that fluid it must be sent. And finally if I aspirated this cyst on Rebecca two weeks ago and she came back to see me and it's there already again, that's odd. I want to send the fluid. Male Speaker: How about just a history of Breast Cancer, I know Rebecca has history in her family? Does that make a difference whether you send the sample or not? Female Speaker: Honestly no, but I always give the patient the option, because to her it feels more likely that this could be cancerous so she wants the extra reassurance. But in truth, having a family history and a gorgeous perfect simple cyst like that on ultrasound doesn't worry me at all. Male Speaker: That wasn't too bad, was that? Female Speaker: No, I didn't hardly felt it. Male Speaker: I think that's so important for women out there to know how simple and easy, and that mass is gone. So now Rebecca what she was feeling before is gone. Female Speaker: It's gone and it won't come back.

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