Breast Cancer Survivor - Velma's Story Video

Velma, a breast cancer survivor, shares her story on how she found out that she had cancer.
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My name is Velma Allen, three-year survivor, just made three years. I had a—first year I went, had a mammogram, nothing. Second year, they thought they saw something and they called me back. Well, I knew there was something wrong when I had to sit in the room so long. And when about three doctors came in, they said, “You know, we just want to see. We want to do a biopsy of a little star that we see.” And I said, “Well, I’m the star whatever star you’re looking for” you know so they said, ‘Well, we are looking for something that we see and it is very suspicious.” And so I had the biopsy which was very uncomfortable. I had to lay out my stomach for almost two hours while they did while I was awake and they did the biopsy. And once they called me and told me, I was told, I was at work. And I called because I hadn’t heard from anybody. When I called then she said, “Are you sitting down?” I said, “No, just tell me.” She said, “Are you driving?” I said, “Well, you call me at work, I’m apparently not” you know “So, can you just tell me.” So she said, “Well, you have early stages of breast cancer.” And I said, “Where the hell that that come from?” You know, “What‘s with that?” So she said, “Well, we need you to come in.” I met with a team. I went to Georgetown University Hospital which was excellent. My surgeon was 33 years old. And when I saw her, I said—so someone said, “Well, you know she’s up on everything. She’s innovative. She’s great in everything.” And she was because she told me, “I’m going in and get that sucker.” And she said, “I’m not leaving until I get it.” And so, I walked into surgery and walked out. And I had 35 treatments of radiation. God was good because I didn’t have to do medication. I didn’t have to do medicines. I just have to you know just maintain and go you know every six months but praise God I’m at a year now because I’ve been cancer-free for at least six months and I was. So now, I go once a year. Yeah, I go once a year.

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