This breast cancer survivor stars in her original comedic retrospective about her diagnosis and recovery.
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Gene Glave 1+ year Cancer Survivor The Mammologues A Woman Show Gene Glave: Already, I had spoken at the first annual survivor seminar Charleston, there is Lowcountry Komen Foundation. I have spoken at the Leadership Development Institute Roper St. Francis. I am going to do it again, and these are the modified versions. I am going to do the whole thing again Piccolo Spoleto and I would be happy to talk to anyone. I'm also going to speak at the Survivor Luncheon, but their theme is follow the follow the pink ribbon road and I am going to use the song Broadway musical Wicked to build some of this around, but of course much of the same -- many of the same incidents will be in there. I didn't get through cancer by -- I mean cancer isn't funny. There were times that I felt awful and I said this in the show. I felt sickly all the time. My energy level was somewhere between 4% in an oyster. My body -- I felt my body image was all askew. I felt ugly and deformed and I was afraid I was going to die. So you're looking at that and you feel terrible. For me the way out the way to climb out was to laugh at it. Question: What do you say to people that say cancer is not funny? Gene Glave: No, it isn't funny, but every bad time in my life as hard as things have ever been, I have to find something to laugh at. That's my defense. And it might not work for other people, but if you can do that, it takes away the power. If you can make fun of something, the power is gone. I couldn't let it rule my life. Question: What are some things that you found humorous about dealing with cancer? Gene Glave: Well, for me they really truly weren't funny, but my husband's reaction to my loss of fingernails. When everything else that he had been through with me, of all of the things about him the most, it was -- Well, not so much, my fingernail is falling off, but his involvement, because I would give him all the way, almost all the way off and then I would go to him and, well you cut this or pull this nail all the way off for me? And he was always so precious and sweet and he said, yes, of course I will. I had no idea that he hated it. Then when I could finally do it myself, I was so proud. So I saved the nail for him and put it on his cushion where he sits to read the paper. Honest to goodness, the man fell apart. And he screamed like a girl. Another thing that happened for me. One of drugs makes your hands and feet hot, I don't know why. So I would sleep with a frozen bottle of water up here and then a frozen bottle of water at my feet. I looked like a praying mantis. Then I go to sleep and the bottle of water would roll and hit my husband in the back and I hear, oh my God. And I thought, am I at a revival? What is happening here? But if you can't laugh at it, it makes this stronger in your life. I couldn't have -- I had too much to do. I needed to work. I love to work. I mean I loved my job. So I wanted work and God knows the people at Roper St. Francis were just, I mean they were like buffeting me at all times and if I looked a least bit green, somebody would give something whether it was Altoid or can I give you a drug or go lie down. They were incredible. I still want to ring bells and being at church, so there was too much for me to do.

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