In this health video learn about a medical first, a man brought out of a coma with glue.
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Algis Bliudzius: Oh! It's beautiful, beautiful day. Jennifer Matthews: If anyone can find beauty on a busy LA street, it's this man. He savors life more since the day he almost lost it. Algis Bliudzius: He gave me the last rites, he blessed me, and I kissed his hand, and he left, and I felt pretty good about it. Jennifer Matthews: But doctors at Cedars-Sinai weren't ready to give up on Algis Bliudzius when he arrived in a coma, drifting in and out of consciousness. For two days, he complained of headaches. Dr. Franklin Moser: This is a bloody fluid surrounding his brain. Jennifer Matthews: An MRI confirmed his doctor's suspicion; a spontaneous spinal fluid leak. Dr. Franklin Moser: We do what's called a blood patch, which is where we take some of their own blood and inject it into the space surrounding the spinal column. Jennifer Matthews: When that didn't work, doctors decided to try something they never tried before; glue, normally used to close surgical incisions. Dr. Franklin Moser: It creates a great deal of scarring. Jennifer Matthews: With guidance from a CT scanner, doctors injected the glue through large needles, sealing off the leak in Algis' upper back. The next day, he was conscious and after a few days, his headache was gone. Algis Bliudzius: It does sound strange, but miracles happen. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors agree Algis is lucky. The glue can cause an allergic reaction, but they say it's often worth the risk when surgery is not an option. This is one man who's glad they took the chance. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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